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ECO PIONEERS


The founders of Hopworks Urban Brewery and Hopworks BikeBar describe the bars as Portland’s fi rst ‘Eco-Brewpubs’


network of planned bikeways from 630 to 962 miles. It also aims to improve and preserve the existing bikeways, increase bicycle parking and encourage cycling by raising awareness and offering free maps and information to the public.


At Portland’s Green Microgym, members generate electricity as they work out


138 LEISURE HANDBOOK 2014


GREEN MUSEUMS When the management at the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI) sat down to create the next fi ve year plan for the museum, they decided it was time to really make sustainability a key focus. “OMSI has had a longstanding commitment to basing activities on a ‘triple bottom line’ of environmental sustainability, fi nancial strength, and social responsibility,” says OMSI’s energy and environment spokesperson Chris Stockner. “In the past, this approach has informed everything from the museum’s facility operations to its goals of educating visitors – but not in a comprehensive way.” The museum is visited by around one million people a year, so there was a real opportunity to help people understand critical issues for the planet. “One of the primary goals we’ve set is to become a key educational resource on sustainability, energy technology and earth systems science,” says Stockner. “We’ve set ourselves a goal to serve as a hub for the public to learn about sustainable solutions and the cutting edge research that’s going on in Oregon and beyond.” The museum’s Energy and Environment Initiative is offering a public platform for


scientists working to create sustainable solutions and act as a bridge between industry and public education. A range of exhibits and programmes


were introduced as part of this initiative. The museum’s Earth Lab features fun, hands-on exhibits and demonstrations aimed at teaching visitors about core earth science concepts such as density, plate tectonics, renewable energy and ice cores. The Sustainability Museum Exhibit aims to encourage visitors to think about how their personal choices can help create a healthier planet. An accompanying outreach programme spreads the message via mobile phone technology, events and transit signage. A permanent, hands-on exhibit on


renewable energy launched in December 2012, focusing on the unique energy mix of the Pacifi c Northwest, including emerging technologies in solar, wind and wave energy. A related classroom outreach programme allows students to design and test their own wind turbine and looks at how families can reduce energy consumption. OMSI is also hoping to infl uence other museums to become more sustainable, and has developed a green exhibition checklist. This provides guidelines on how to use recycled, locally-sourced materials in exhibitions and how to offset the impact of carbon emissions from the energy used. Other green measures include new chillers within the museum, which are reducing the museum’s electricity use by around 20 per cent, the introduction of


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PHOTO: © BARBIE HULL


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