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The higher appeal of luxury and premium products is most notable in many key emerging markets such as Brazil (Lapinha spa above) and India


The importance of tailored off erings


It’s essential to understand the services that are most likely to resonate with local spa visitors. The public bathing culture traditionally associated with European spas will clash with notions of modesty held by consumers in some Asian markets. However, there are positive prospects for attracting consumers with beauty treatments such as skincare. In China the beauty market is worth


roughly US$21bn (¤16bn, £13.5bn). A SpaFinder Wellness’ Top Ten Spa Trends for 2012 report predicts Brazil, Russia, China and India will contribute over half of the total US$43bn (¤32.9bn, £27.7bn) growth for the global beauty industry by 2014. Smaller markets like Vietnam have also seen market expansion of beauty – an article in a 2010 McKinsey Quarterly said “The Vietnam Ministry of Industry and Trade forecasts the


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market for beauty products will grow 15 per cent a year for the foreseeable future.” In addition to locally relevant service


offerings, spa operators will also benefi t from integrating local approaches to health and wellbeing. This is likely to attract international as well as local customers. As recently noted by an Indian commentator from The Futures Company’s Global Streetscape network: “People are embracing modernity but they also preserve old beliefs. Blindly adopting western customs is not considered cool and belief in traditional systems of knowledge such as ayurveda, and vedic astrology is growing.” Many Indian spa operators include ayurvedic therapies in their offering, to attract both foreign and domestic visitors who know their benefi ts, or want to try local therapies. As the world becomes more multipolar both in its economic and its cultural


exchanges, understanding the needs, aspirations and tastes of new consumer groups will increasingly be a differentiator for the spa business as well. ●


✪ ABOUT THE AUTHOR


Vera Kiss is an analyst at The Futures Company. She has a strong interest in how people engage with their health in diverse markets. She’s a member of The Futures Company’s Health and Wellness knowledge venturing team that publishes thought leadership on health, wellness and nutrition trends. EMAIL: vera.kiss@thefuturescompany.com


From Spa Business Handbook 2013 p126


READ MORE ONLINE CLICK HERE LEISURE HANDBOOK 2014 135


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