This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
1999 Friends of the High Line is founded by Joshua David and Robert Hammond.


JAN – JULY 2003 A competition, ‘Designing the High Line’, solicits proposals for the High Line’s reuse.


JUNE 2008 Final designs are released for the High Line’s transformation into a public park.


JUNE 2009 Section 1 (Gansevoort Street to West 20th Street) opens to the public.


JUNE 2011 Section 2 (West 20th Street to West 30th Street) opens to the public.


Images highlight the changing story of the High Line through the decades


Can you describe a few of your main outreach programmes? The High Line stands today because the community rallied to save it from demolition and transform it into public open space. It is important that the park continues to be a special place for New Yorkers. We have several programmes to strengthen connections with our neighbours, including a youth corps from the local housing projects and education partnerships with nearby schools.


What about environmental projects? The High Line is a mile-long green roof which is designed to retain as much water as possible. This year we started our fi rst composting programme. We’re sending our plant clippings to Fresh Kills Landfi ll on Staten Island to be recycled and turned into compost, and we’re working with High Line food vendors to minimise waste by using compostable cups, plates, and utensils and compost some of their scraps.


www.leisurehandbook.com


How did you choose your vendors? We selected food vendors through an open, competitive process. When selecting, it was important their food and beverage offerings were unique, interesting, and made with sustainable local ingredients.


How have the public responded? It’s been overwhelming and has far exceeded our expectations. Before the park opened, we estimated around 300,000 people would visit the park year. We’ve had about two million people a year and we’re on track to have around three million this year.


How does this compare to other attractions in the city? We’re one of the most-visited parks per square foot in the whole of New York City. On a yearly basis, our visitor numbers sit somewhere between the MoMA (2.5 million visitors) and the Statue of Liberty (5 million visitors per year).


Green in the city: the structure weaves its way through Manhattan’s cityscape


LEISURE HANDBOOK 2014 161


PHOTO: © IWAN BAAN


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