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MIELE - GREEN WASHING S


ports venues and clubs often process a large amount of sports kit and laundry and so laundry equipment is often used many times a day and for long periods of time. If your on-site washing machine or dryer is more than a decade old, it’s consuming a lot more electricity than it needs to and wasting valuable resources. Today’s major appliances do not consume electricity the way older models do. Miele Professional has put energy


efficiency and minimising running costs at the heart of its product development of laundry equipment, which means any new appliance you buy today will use less electricity than the model you’re replacing.


There are energy-efficient machines such as Miele’s heat-pump dryers that require no ducting and easy to install: the heat-pump technology brings drying times for a 10kg of laundry load down to only 44 minutes. This means that only 0.21kWh* is required per kg of laundry, equating to a reduction in energy consumption of 60 per cent, compared with a conventional Miele vented dryer with the same load capacity. Customers have reported that in 18 months they’ve already made savings and in five years, Miele predicts heat pump dryers will take over from condenser dryers. * Basis of calculation: 100kg of laundry


per day, 250 days per year / Electricity costs: E0.19/kWh, reduction in residual moisture from 50 to 0 per cent. l


ZERO WASTE EVENTS LAUNCHED FOR THE UK


A


new industry road map for the UK, entitled Zero Waste Events: a 2020 vision, has been launched for the sports events


sector. The scheme has the goal of no waste being sent to landfill from UK sports events by the end of the decade. The challenge will be significant – the events sector is very complex and comprises thousands of operators. It supports around 25,000 businesses and 500,000 full-time jobs. It has a significant impact on the economy, with a current value of £36bn ($59bn E44bn – projected to rise to £48bn ($77 E57) by 2020. The industry could maximise the opportunities afforded by reducing waste to its advantage.


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While some of the sector has achieved up to a 50 per cent recycling rate for events, most are averaging just 15 per cent, with a large amount of waste going to landfill. The new roadmap has been developed by WRAP (Waste & Resources Action Programme), collaborating with the events industry as part of its work on the European Pathway to Zero Waste (EPOW) project. The roadmap draws on lessons learned from the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games, creating a series of steps that both events and the industry in general can take to achieve sustainable events. The roadmap is the first stage in raising awareness of the positive impact which effective management of waste has on the delivery of events, both economically and environmentally. Specifically it sets out a clear vision for how the industry can achieve zero waste to landfill from the events sector by 2020. It also challenges the industry to consider how it can work more in partnership across


the supply chain and highlights the steps that need to be considered when preparing for and delivering a zero waste event. Dr Liz Goodwin, CEO of WRAP, said: “The London 2012 Olympics showed what could be achieved by a clear commitment, by preventing waste and managing it well. “Making waste prevention part of an event’s plan delivers significant savings for businesses large and small. It will benefit all, from local community activities up to large scale events. The events industry roadmap was developed to support business growth by managing resources efficiently. It’s a simple vision, but it’s only by the industry individually and collectively taking on the challenge, that it can be realised.” Details: www.wrap.org.uk l


From Sports Management Issue 1 2013, p60


READ MORE ONLINE CLICK HERE LEISURE HANDBOOK 2014 151


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