This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
INTERVIEW Gloria Feldt


Tell us about No Excuses and where the idea for the book came from?


I’ve been thrilled to see women break open so many doors during my decades of activism. But when I dis- covered while writing an article on women’s political participation for Elle magazine during the 2008 U.S. elections that at the rate women are going, it’ll take 70 years to get to parity in elective office, I decided I had to speed the process! Then I found that these numbers are not just true in politics. Women hold only 18% of top leadership roles at work too--and that’s not fair, or good for men, women, a balanced family life, or even companies’ return on investment accord- ing to McKenzie and Company studies.


Yet in spite of the cultural barriers that remain, from the boardroom to the bedroom no law or structural barrier is holding us women back now, except ourselves. The power is in our hands if we choose to use it to change the system. We buy 85% of consumer goods, we are 60% of college graduates, we make up half the paid workforce. In politics, women can raise money as pro- ficiently as men now and voters often trust us more. There are many reasons for the continuing disparities, but I came to see that there are no excuses any more.


That’s when I knew I had to write the book that became No Excuses: 9 Ways Women Can Change How We


9 INSPIRATIONAL WOMAN MAGAZINE


Think About Power. The subtitle is important. I didn’t want to write another one of those books that talks about what’s wrong with women. I set out to give the historical and social context, and then to answer my favorite question: “So what are we going to do about it?” My intent was not to blame but to inspire. To give women concrete ways--I call them “power tools” to redefine power in positive terms and embrace it. To reach their goals authentically as women, not as women trying to be men. The result, I believe, will not just be gender parity and greater fairness for women at work, in the home, and in politics, but also a world in which both women and men are more likely to thrive.


How would you describe the modern woman’s rela- tionship with power?


Ambivalent. We want the benefits but not always the responsibility. It is easier to become co-opted by a little success and not hold out for the whole package. Sometimes it’s even easier not to have choices--hence the so-called “op out generation.” But is “easy” the same as fulfilling? I don’t think so, at least not over the long haul of life. Such thinking often leaves wom- en without economic power later in life, by the way, if they have depended on men to support them and then something goes awry (divorce, death, loss of employ- ment).


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76