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7 proven tips to boost your child’s confidence:


♦ Stand Up For Themselves — Encourage them to stand up for themselves and for what they think without being mean or hurting others.


♦ Use Confident Body Lan- guage — Encourage them to use their body and eyes: stand up straight and look people in the eye when they talk. To talk in a level tone, not too loud but not too soft.


♦ Stay Calm — Always encour- age them to try and stay calm. If they don’t feel calm, they can have a little walk or take some deep breaths to calm them- selves down.


♦ Encourage them to speak what they want — When they are not happy doing some- thing, they should just say so. They don’t have to agree all the time, they should be able to say what they feel.


♦ A lesson from a mistake — It’s OK to make mistakes! Things turn out well often after going wrong a few times, but it’s really important to learn when things go wrong. There is a quote that says, ‘you learn from your mistakes’ and we believe in this quote. Some- times, letting children make a mistake is more beneficial than jumping in and saying, “Oh don’t worry, I’ll help you!” By doing this, you are mak- ing them dependant on you. Therefore, a lesson learnt in life is a value earned for life!


♦ Walk with Confidence — Oth- ers are more likely to respect them if they act, talk and walk with confidence


♦ Avoid comparison — This is the worst thing a parent/ carer can do to their child. For example, “Why can’t you play football like Mike?” This will hurt them at heart and will constantly remind them of their weaknesses. Let your child know that you appreciate his/ her uniqueness which will help their confidence level.


If started from an early age, con- fidence building will help children become more fulfilled and a posi- tive adult!


INSPIRATIONAL QUOTE: Aerodynamically the bumblebee shouldn’t be able to fly, but the bumblebee doesn’t know that so it goes on flying anyway. ~Mary Kay Ash


The above quote explains why we must not stop our children to explore things that are within their reach and safe. Let them make mistakes and learn from them too!


Some post-it notes… ♦ Appreciate their good behaviour and apprehend their bad behaviour!


♦ Children learns what they live, so be a role model.


♦ Be caring parents, not scaring par- ents.


♦ Marks are not the criteria of intel- ligence of the child.


♦ Pressure creates resistance. ♦ Appreciate the value of play ♦ Making time for your child ♦ Teach your child right from wrong


♦ Making time for family activities ♦ Taking care of yourself and improving your skills


♦ Making it work for the whole family ♦ Helping your child to avoid comparing and helping them to see their talent or interests and praising them when they do well.


♦ Encourage your child to ask ques- tions with openness and honesty.


♦ Each child is unique and is born with some special talents. The duty of par- ent is to provide the infrastructure to child for time planning, setting goals, read books and help them bring up their talents. ■


© Kidz4Mation 2011 Visit www.kidz4mation.com for free parenting advice and free fun develop- mental activities for kids. We are running workshops for children to boost their confidence and overcome their lack of shyness. Book your child’s place from the website or visit http://www.kidz4mation. com/bullying-and-shyness-workshops. php.


Seema Thobhani is the epitome of the modern-day mother. She skilfully balances the challenges of raising two young daughters Nikita, 5 and Simran, 3, with the demands of her role as a Director of K4M. Her passion for child development drives her, outside of K4M, to run successful cultural and spiritual develop- ment classes for five to ten year olds. Seema’s natural patience


and empathy with children makes her ideally suited to the roles of mother and tutor.


65 INSPIRATIONAL WOMAN MAGAZINE


July/August 2011 65


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