This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Use ceiling fans all year long Craig


A


basic cooling concept borrowed from earlier times, the use of ceiling fans is a practice that has been popular for residential use since the


1980s. Most of us have them in our homes, but I have noticed that they are not always utilized properly. Many homeowners use them in the warm summer


months to take advantage of the cooling benefi ts. T is cooling eff ect occurs when air moves over skin. It is a dynamic known as “evaporative cooling.” We oſt en hear the local television meteorologists talk


about “wind chill.” Same principle. In the summer, when a ceiling fan is blowing air directly on us, we feel more comfortable. We can even turn the thermostat to a high- er setting, which in turn saves us energy dollars. T en comes winter and ceiling fans are switched off to


avoid the chill. Sounds logical, doesn’t it? But keep in mind that ceiling fans can be used for


more than just evaporative cooling. T ey are also very effi cient at mixing air in a room. As you know, cooler air sinks to the fl oor and warmer


air is always found closer to the ceiling—when what we really want is a moderate temperature throughout the room. T e solution to this problem is as close as your ceiling fan’s “reverse” switch. All newer ceiling fans and most of the older ones have


them built into the housing of the appliance itself. If not, it may be located on the wall control or on the remote control. Simply fl ip the switch and watch the blades of the fan turn in the opposite direction (clockwise as you look up at the fan). Instead of blowing downward di- rectly on you, the fan pulls air up from below and moves it along the ceiling and down the walls, mixing warm air from above with the colder air on the fl oor. T is will improve the temperature for the entire room.


Hendrickson Residential Energy Auditor


Winter is also a good time to switch the fan to a lower speed to reduce the amount of moving air. Some energy experts believe ceiling fans should be


turned off when a room is unoccupied. I agree unless there is a thermostat in the room. In this case, I reason the fan should be used to mix the air so the thermostat can operate based on a true temperature for the space. T is will create a more comfortable zone and allow your HVAC system to operate more effi ciently.


10 - Northeast Connection


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152