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LIVEWIRE | PAGE 3


Member Tim Beard wins a $50 bill credit


BY JULIANN GRAHAM, Communications Specialist


ri-County Electric Cooperative member Tim Beard is happy he will get a break on this month’s electric bill. Because he took a couple of minutes to enter the cooperative’s Quarterly Question drawing and was lucky enough to have his name randomly drawn from the entries, he will receive a $50 credit on his May bill.


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Originally from Colorado, Beard moved to Guymon about eight months ago.


“I believe being a cooperative member has its advantages as far as cheaper electricity,” Beard said. “And the service is great.”


The 1Q-2013 Quarterly Question was, ‘What low-cost method do you use to save energy?’ Beard’s response was, ‘I use auto timers on lights and appliances like coffee maker computers and televisions. I also run a minimum of lights at night.’


Beard has been proactive in managing his energy use to keep his electric bill low.


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uarterly uestion


2Q-2013


How do you use the TCEC Mobile smartphone app? If you don’t have it, tell us why.


Answer the above question to be entered into a drawing for a $50 credit on your electric bill. Submit your entry via mail to Tri-County Electric, P.O. Box 880, Hooker, OK 73945. Or via email to info@tcec.coop or online at www.tcec.coop. Include your name and contact info.


The fine print: Entry must be received by June 30. Any response is acceptable. Any response may be published. Entrants must be members of Tri-County Electric Cooperative. Entries must include member’s full name and valid contact information, such as a phone number or email. Winner will be drawn and notified in July but will be announced in the August newsletter. The $50 credit will apply toward winner’s August bill. Credit is nontransferable. One entry per member per quarter. Tri-County Electric employees, trustees and their immediate family members are not eligible to win. n


TIM BEARD OF GUYMON WAS RANDOMLY CHOSEN AS THE WINNER OF THE FIRST QUARTER 2013 QUARTERLY QUESTION CONTEST. HE RECEIVED A $50 BILL CREDIT.


“I replaced all the lights in my home with CFL bulbs,” he said. “I use solar lighting outdoors and LEDs for things like Christmas lights.” n


WIN $50!


CEO VIEW CONTINUED FROM PAGE ONE


If you don’t have a transfer switch, power provided by the generator can “backfeed” along power lines, which can electrocute a lineman working on those lines.


In addition, portable generators create carbon monoxide, the odorless, colorless gas that can quickly become deadly if the generator isn’t exhausted outside. Attached garages with an open door don’t count—the carbon monoxide can still seep indoors and poison inhabitants. Generators must go outside in a dry area, which might mean you’ll need to rig a canopy to protect it from precipitation at a safe distance from your home’s windows, doors, and vents. How far is a safe distance? Even 15 feet can be too close.


Other things to keep in mind: Plug appliances directly into the generator using heavy-duty, outdoor-rated extension cords, but don’t overload it. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for maximum load. Shut off the generator before refueling, or a fire could start—and it’s a good idea to have a fully charged fire extinguisher nearby, just in case.


Safety is a top priority at Tri-County Electric for our employees and consumer-members alike. Contact us at 800-522-3315 or memberservice@tcec.coop if you’d like to learn more about how to properly install and use a portable generator.


For more tips on how to stay safe during a power outage, visit www.tcec.coop. n


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