This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Northeast Connection is published monthly to communicate with the members of Northeast Oklahoma Electric Cooperative.


Offi cers and Trustees


PRESIDENT - Dandy Allan Risman, District 5 VICE PRESIDENT - John L. Myers, District 4


SECRETARY-TREASURER - Benny L. Seabourn, District 2 4 During Outdoor Work, Play Look Up, Stay Alert A


s the weather begins to warm, kids and adults alike will soon head out- side to perform winter clean-up and play. Before they do, remind them to look up and be alert for power lines and other electrical hazards, the


best way to stay safe from electrocution—and even death. For the employees of Northeast Oklahoma Electric, using proper procedures


and safety measures is a matter of life and death. We take safety seriously at home, too. Accidents happen, but if we educate ourselves and our children, we can keep them to a minimum.


For kids • Never fl y a kite on a rainy day or anywhere but an open space. A high point in the sky makes a kite a grounding point for lightning, and kites could easily become tangled in power lines.


• Don’t climb trees that are near power lines and poles—evergreens can dis- guise dangers year round as leaves will during the spring and summer.


• Stay far away from power lines lying on the ground. You can’t tell if electricity is still fl owing through them. If there’s water nearby, don’t go in it. Water is the best conductor of electricity.


• Obey signs that say “danger” and “keep out” around electrical equipment, like substations. T ese signs aren’t warnings; they’re commands to keep you safe.


• Never climb a power pole.


For adults • If power lines run through your trees, call Northeast Oklahoma Electric— professional tree trimmers with proper protective equipment can trim branches safely.


• Remember that power lines and other utilities run underground, too. Call 811 to have utility lines marked before you start digging.


• Starting to clean up that winter mess? Sweep dried leaves and debris from outdoor receptacles.


• If they’re not already, consider upgrading your outdoor receptacles—or any outlets that could come in contact with water—to ground fault circuit inter- rupters (GFCIs). GFCIs immediately interrupt power fl ow when a plugged-in device comes in contact with water. Regardless, keep your outlets and cords dry and covered outside.


• Use only weather-resistant, heavy-duty extension cords marked for outdoor use.


• Don’t leave outdoor power tools unattended for curious children or animals to fi nd.


For more safety tips and information, visit SafeElectricity.org. May 2013 - 3


If this is your account number, contact the co-op at 1-800-256-6405, extension 9332, to claim a $25 credit on your electric account.


LUCKY ACCOUNT NUMBER 940600


ASST. SECRETARY-TREASURER - Everett L. Johnston, District 3 Harold W. Robertson, District 1 Sharron Gay, District 6 James A. Wade, District 7 Bill R. Kimbrell, District 8 Jack Caudill, District 9


Management Team Anthony Due, General Manager


Larry Cisneros, P.E., Manager of Engineering Services Susanne Frost, Manager of Offi ce Services Cindy Hefner, Manager of Public Relations Connie Porter, Manager of Financial Services Rick Shurtz, Manager of Operations


Vinita headquarters: Four and a half miles east of Vinita on Highway 60/69 at 27039 South 4440 Road.


Grove offi ce: 212 South Main.


Business hours: Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Offi ces are closed Saturday, Sunday and holidays. Available 24 hours at: 1-800-256-6405


If you experience an outage: 1. Check your switch or circuit breaker in the house and on the meter pole to be sure the trouble is not on your side of the service.


2. When contacting the cooperative to report an outage, use the name as it appears on your bill, and have both your pole number and account


number ready.


Please direct all editorial inquiries to Communications Specialist Clint Branham at 800-256-6405 ext. 9340 or email clint.branham@neelectric.com.


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