This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Safety


Stay Away From Power Lines During Spring Chores


Leave Electrical


Work to the Pros Even the handiest do-it-yourselfers


know it’s not safe to repair their own electricity. Your best bet: Spring for a licensed,


qualified electrician when your home’s electricity or electric appliances are on the fritz.


Even if you turn your electricity off at


the circuit breaker box, it’s not necessarily safe to work on your home’s plugs and wiring. Te Electrical Safety Foundation International also recommends:


a Study your panel’s circuit breakers or fuses so you will know which one controls each switch, light, and outlet.


a Suit up in safety goggles and gloves before touching electrical components.


a Triple-check that you have turned off the right circuits before you start any work. It’s easy to flip the wrong switch by accident.


a Make 100 percent sure the circuit cannot be accidentally turned back on while you are working. Let everyone in the house know the breaker box is off limits until you say otherwise.


a Use a circuit tester to verify the switch you are working on is operating properly before you turn everything back on.


a Even then, consider leaving dangerous electrical work—even small jobs—to a pro who knows the ins and outs of how to stay safe—and keep your home safe—when electrical work is needed.


Whether you’re pruning a tree, installing an


antenna, or operating farm equipment, steer clear of overhead power lines. Contact with a live wire can damage your


equipment. If you’re touching that equipment when it makes that contact, it can seriously injure or even kill


you. [19-181-246-01] a If it looks like you or your equipment will come within 15 feet of any power line, make a new plan. Any


closer is too close for safety. a Assume any wire you see is a live electrical line. Do not assume the wire is a telephone or cable line. Call your electric cooperative to make absolutely sure. Do not touch a branch if it is touching a wire. If the wire breaks, assume it is energized and can injure or kill you. Report the problem to your electric cooperative and


keep everyone away from it until help arrives. a If you’re using a ladder, keep it far enough away from all power lines that it won’t touch one if it falls over. Te Consumer Product Safety Commission reports ladders contacting power lines cause nine


percent of electrocutions each year. a Take the day off if it rains. Climbing ladders and working with big equipment in bad weather is an invitation for you to lose your footing and knock something—or yourself—into a power line.


News Magazine 11


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152