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The ElectraLite


Look Up, Stay Alert During Outdoor Work, Play


As the weather begins warm up, kids and adults alike will soon head outside to perform winter clean-up and play. Before they do, remind them to look up and be alert for power lines and other electrical hazards, the best way to stay safe from electrocution—and even death.


“Here at Canadian Valley, using proper procedures and safety measures is a matter of life and death,” explains CVEC Safety Coordinator Cordis Slaughter. “We take safety seriously at home, too. Accidents happen, but if we educate ourselves and our children, we can keep them to a minimum.” For kids


• Never fly a kite on a rainy day or anywhere but an open space. A high point in the sky makes a kite a grounding point for lightning, and kites could easily become tangled in power lines. • Don’t climb trees that are near power lines and poles—evergreens can disguise dan- gers this time of year; leaves during the spring and summer. • Stay far away from power lines lying on the ground. You can’t tell if electricity is still flowing through them. If there’s water nearby, don’t go in it. Water is the best conduc- tor of electricity.


• Obey signs that say “danger” and “keep out” around large electrical equipment, like


substations. These signs aren’t warnings; they’re commands to keep you safe. • Never climb a power pole. For adults


• If power lines run through your trees, call CVEC – professional tree trimmers with proper protective equipment can trim branches safely. • Remember that power lines and other utilities run underground, too. Call 811 to have utility lines marked before you start digging.


• Starting that winter cleanup yard work? Sweep 605041404 dried leaves and debris from outdoor receptacles. • If they’re not already, consider upgrading your outdoor receptacles – or any outlets that could come in contact with water – to ground fault circuit interrupters (GFCIs). GFCIs immediately interrupt power flow when a plugged-in device comes in contact with water. Regardless, keep your outlets and cords dry and covered outside. • Use only weather-resistant, heavy-duty extension cords marked for outdoor use. • Don’t leave outdoor power tools unattended for curious children or animals to find.


By George Continued from page 1.


As an electric cooperative we are keenly aware of the impact increasing costs for electricity has on our customers. For a residential consumer or a businessman or a globally competing industry, increasing electric rates have the same impact on the bottom line as a tax on the bottom line. Most electric consumers don’t have any “credits” to offset this higher electric bill. Their standard of living suffers. For many of our residential customers, an affordable electric bill is a prerequisite to affordable health care.


Find Your Hidden Account Number and Win $25


If you find your account number hidden in this issue of The Electralite, you could win $25.


In order to win, the account number must be your own. You need to report finding the number to us by the 15th of the month. And you need to report finding it by phone, mail or in person. Good luck!


May 2013


Clear Rights-of-Way Continued from page 1


annual budget and annually measure our success from maintenance cycle to maintenance cycle. Animal and storm-caused outages


reflect that age old struggle between good (us) and evil (those pesky animals and storm outages.) Annually, animals and storms will cause hundreds of pow- er outages. Consumers today, myself included, are increasingly less tolerant of a power outage or even a momentary blink. Our homes are filled with devices that rely on power to function, and we have grown to rely on those devices for us to function. Over the years your cooperative has implemented a variety of methods, programs, and devices to minimize outages and blinks where possible. Lightning arresters, sectional- izing schemes, animal guards, insulated jumper wires, increasing clearances, line patrol programs, pole inspection programs, real-time system monitoring, and improved maintenance programs are a few examples of what we do to accomplish one goal; improved reliabil- ity.


Annually we submit outage data to


the Oklahoma Corporation Commission that they compile and include in an annual report. We consistently fair well against our peers. While I am proud of that, we are not in the business to impress our peers. We exist for the sole purpose of providing affordable and reliable service to our members, you and yes, me.


FINANCIAL STATEMENT


BEGINNING BALANCE 2/28/13..... Deposits......................................................... Interest Income ............................................... Checks Issued ............................................. Approved, not yet paid .......................... BALANCE 3/31/13.............................


$189,840.17 7,978.94 67.20


-2,573.61 -16,392.04


$178,920.66


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