This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
ELECTRICAL SAFETY DURING AND AFTER STORMS


Severe storms and natural disasters can cause a variety of electrical safety hazards in and around our homes. Lightning, downed power lines, and floods are just a few of the serious safety concerns associated with storms.


Unfortunately, many of these electrical safety hazards remain long after the storm itself has passed. Here are some tips from the Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI) to help you and your loved ones stay safe during and after storms.


Lightning – Though you may feel that you are miles away from lightning, it can strike anywhere and it is always looking for a path to the ground. You should take precautions to ensure that lightning’s path does not pass through a human body to get to the ground. There is not always warning before lightning strikes, so be prepared at all times. If you are outside during a lightning storm: • Move to a low point. Lightning strikes the tallest available object. • Stay away from trees. • Avoid metal and water; don’t hold on to metal bats, golf clubs, fishing rods, tennis rackets, fences, sheds, poles, etc. Stay away from anything damp, including grass.


• Don’t stand near other people. Spread out. If you are driving when a lightning storms strikes: • Slow down and use extra caution; pull off the road into a safe area if possible. • Do not leave your vehicle and do not use electronic devices while in the vehicle. If you are inside your home during a lightning storm: • Stay away from windows and doors. • If possible, unplug electronic equipment before the storm arrives; avoid contact with electrical equipment during storms.


• Avoid contact with water and plumbing, including sinks, baths and faucets. • Use only cordless or cell phones; corded telephones should be used only for emergencies.


Downed Power Lines – These pose severe and possibly lethal threats. Be aware of your surroundings at all times and if you see a power line down remain at least 10 feet away from the line and anything touching it. The proper way to move away from the line is to shuffle away with small steps, keeping your feet together and on the ground at all times. • If you see a person in contact with the downed power line call 911 immediately. Do not touch the person or you could be the next victim.


• Do not attempt to move or drive over a downed power line. • If you are in your car and it is in contact with a power line, stay in the car and warn others to stay away from the vehicle and call for help. If your vehicle is on fire, jump out of the car with both feet together and shuffle away as directed above.


Flooded Areas – Standing water should always be approached with extreme caution. Submerged outlets or electrical cords in a flooded basement can energize the water and pose a lethal trap. • Do not use electrical appliances that have been wet until they have been examined by a qualified service repair dealer.


• Electrical items such as circuit breakers, fuses, ground fault circuit interrupters (GFCIs) can malfunction when water and silt get inside. Discard them if they have been submerged.


Connect with us on social media for up-to-date power outage-related news and alerts during storm season.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152