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C A N A D I A N MAY 2013


V SUPPLEMENT TO OKLAHOMA LIVING


Clear Rights-of-Way Help Prevent Outages


by Cordis Slaughter CVEC Manager of Operations Spring is in the air and most folks


are beginning to think about fishing trips, summer vacations, or maybe one of those projects around the house that has been on that back burner forever. As Operations Manager for your elec- tric cooperative, I too am having those same thoughts, but they are overshad- owed by nightmares of trees growing up into the line, squirrels and snakes turning your lights off, and giant thunderstorms causing massive power outages. That’s one of the drawbacks of this career, I suppose. I came to CVEC in late 1977 and can


remember miles and miles of powerline rights of ways literally covered in trees from an inadequate or even non-existent maintenance program. Over the years we have tried to continually evaluate and improve annual budgets and methods in an effort to improve our rights of way. Three years ago we promoted Rusty Pritchett to Right of Way Specialist. Rusty has a degree in Agriculture and field experience prior to and during his time at CVEC. Over the past 3 years Rusty has developed an extensive database containing both outage and right of way maintenance data. Using this information, Rusty has put in place a maintenance plan making use of our in-house geographical information system (GIS) system and a Circuit Prioriti- zation Model developed by Environmental Consultants, Inc. We now have the abil- ity to instantly query any section of powerline and tell who last maintained the right of way, how many feet were cut trimmed or sprayed, and what were the as- sociated costs. The model will allow us to responsibly target our nearly $2 million


Continued on page 3 In recognition of Memorial Day, CVEC offices will be closed Monday, May 27.


Service personnel will be on duty should you experience an interruption in your electric service. Call 1-877-382-3680 to report an outage.


A ELECTRALITE By George


What comes first, food, shelter, medi- cine, electricity, doing without? Growing pressures on the production of electricity will continue to put upward pressure on costs, including additional environmental regulations governing air, water and disposal of ash, as well as continued increases in fuel prices. Lower natural gas prices in 2012 had a significant impact on power costs during the year. All of these savings from lower natural gas prices during 2012 were passed on to consumers. This resulted in a $19 million reduction in electric rates. However, about half that reduction was offset by other cost increases keeping customers from seeing the full benefit of the reduced natural gas price in their monthly electric bills.


All transmission lines in the multi- state area are managed by the Southwest Power Pool (SPP), a regional transmis- sion organization. That organization has approved $7.1 billion in new regional, socialized cost transmission. Costs are now rapidly being included in the rate base. Our power supplier’s portion of this cost increased $8 million dollars in 2012. Currently approved transmission projects in the SPP will likely increase our share of the socialized transmission cost by about $3 million per year for the next 5 years. This is only for the cur- rently approved transmission plan which will likely increase from year to year as regulatory mandates to increase reli- ability and security, as well as to provide transmission paths for renewable energy, continue to grow.


National Electric Reliability Corp (NERC) reliability and security costs added over $1 million in new costs to our power supplier - WFEC - in 2012 in the form of training, materials and labor. Four new full time employees were


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