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BY BRETT BRENNER ELECTRICAL SAFETY FOUNDATION INTERNATIONAL


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tatistics show that home fires, from a variety of causes, result in a significant number of deaths and injuries each year. According to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), U.S. fire departments respond to an estimated average of 371,700 home structure fires per year. These fires cause an estimated average of 2,590 civilian deaths and 12,910 civilian injuries.


Although electrical hazards plague the public at large, older adults are burdened with the gravest risk. Adults over the age of 65 are more than twice as likely to die from a house fire as the general population, and this risk increases with age. Those 75 years of age and over are challenged with a risk that is 2.8 times higher, and adults over 85 are at a staggering risk that is 3.7 times higher. As baby boomers enter retirement age, the United States Fire Administration (USFA) has predicted that the percentage of older Americans will increase significantly, thus making a corresponding increase in fire deaths and injuries among older adults probable.


Electrical failures are a leading cause of home fires every year, and electrical distribution and lighting equipment fires have been shown to increase in frequency with increasing dwelling age. Homes with aging electrical systems are at a heightened risk for electrical fires, posing a serious risk for older adults who have remained in the same home for an extended period of time. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, half of the homes in use in the United States were built before 1973, which is long before many of the electronics and appliances we use today were even invented. Unfortunately, our increased demands for energy can overburden an older home’s electrical system causing fires or electrocutions.


Many home electrical fires can be prevented by using more up-to-date technology and recognizing warning signs in your home. Follow these easy safety tips to identify and prevent electrical hazards in your home:





Electrical Safet: Elderly At Risk Protect your loved ones from home electrical fires


Regularly check all cords, outlets, switches, and appliances for signs of damage or wear.


• Use extension cords only temporarily. •


Be sure that outlets are not overloaded with too many devices. They can overheat and start a fire.





Look and listen for warning signs of an electrical problem such as outlets and switches that are warm, or make crackling, sizzling or buzzing sounds.





Always replace fuses or circuit breakers with the correct size and amperage. And make sure all circuits are labeled correctly.





Consider having your breakers upgraded to state-of-the-art AFCI circuit breakers. Keep the electrical panel accessible so you can quickly shut off power in an emergency.





Install smoke alarms on every level of your home. Place alarms inside each bedroom and outside each sleeping area. Test them once a month, change the batteries at least once a year, and replace the alarm itself every ten years.


These tips are featured in the Electrical Safety Foundation’s newly launched “Home Fire Safety for Older Adults Safety Awareness Program,” which provides tools to educate older adults about home fire hazards. Resources for older adults, including detailed fact and tip sheets, are available at www.esfi.org/safetyeducators.


This effort is part of ESFI’s National Electrical Safety Month initiative, “Electrical Safety for All Ages.”ESFI sponsors Electrical Safety Month each May, and engages in public education campaigns throughout the year to prevent electrical fires, injuries, and fatalities.


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