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Park People www.parkworld-online.com


MAMMOTH BIGGER THAN BIG! Q Lines


Mammoth, the world’s longest waters coaster, has opened at Holiday World & Splashin' Safari, Santa Claus, Indiana – just one year after the same park added a HydroMagnetic Rocket called Wildebeest. Both attractions come courtesy of ProSlide Technologies. At 1,763feet – a third of a mile or over half a kilometre – Mammoth smashes Wildebeest’s world record by 8ft (2.4m) and uses hydro-magnetic


technology to propel six and eight-person rafts up a series of hills utilising linear induction motors (LIMs). The ride begins with a conveyor belt lifthill followed by a series of seven drops including a three-story fall at 45º, reaching speeds of up to 40ft a second (45mph). Park World talked with Brad Goodbody, ProSlide marketing manager, about this, the company’s first HydroMagnetic Mammoth.


Were you surprised when Holiday World approached you for another ride so soon after Wildebeest? Holiday World has a reputation of building world- class coasters so it wasn’t a huge surprise when they approached us with the challenge of taking the all the exhilaration of the Wildebeest and turning it up to a level. We set out to build the largest, longest and most powerful water coaster ever built. The HydroMagnetic Mammoth checks all those boxes.


Please explain the technology behind Mammoth


The HydroMagnetic Mammoth utilises ProSlide’s patented hydro-magnetic technology which has been in development for around a decade. There has been a huge amount of engineering that has gone into this and ProSlide has a dedicated team whose sole focus is to constantly improve and push the boundaries of where this technology can go.


Older water coasters use water propulsion which is very limited in the weight it can push uphill. Hydro- magnetics provides the propulsion of going uphill and are based on induction motors creating a travelling magnetic field which interacts with boats. The new CloverWheel boat [by Z Pro] is an important innovation and makes the ride possible. Each guest is securely positioned in their own seat to enjoy the coaster thrills and 360 degrees of potential ride paths. Imagine going downhill backwards and then spinning 180 degrees to travel back up the hill forwards – it’s incredible!


How does this differ to your other water coasters?


The power of the hydro-magnetic motors create a smooth speed which is not jerky or uncomfortable


like traditional water propulsion. There's also the obvious advantage of being able to move larger vehicles and more guests. The HydroMagnetic Hornet (2-person), HydroMagnetic Rocket (4- person) and HydroMagnetic Mammoth (6-8 person) are revolutionary products that have created a new product category in the industry. The Mammoth differs from the other HydroMagnetic rides primarily due to the sheer size of the fibreglass at 12ft diameter, the size and power of the LIMs and the unique design of the 6- man CloverWheel boats.


What benefits do hydro-magnetcs offer to waterpark operators? Hydro-magnetic coasters are the “greenest” water coasters in the world. Although the motors are very powerful, we’ve perfected a way of using them so they’re only on for a very short amount of time – fractions of a second! We also offer global, long-term support for our customers. Our engineers can access any ride around the world and monitor performance, diagnosis preventative maintenance, and troubleshoot issues. We’re proud to pioneer such a valuable service for our clients.


Where else will you be introducing the HydroMagnetic Mammoth in the months to come? We’re already working with other world-leading waterparks, including Yas Waterworld in Abu Dhabi, to design custom HydroMagnetic Mammoth as their anchor attraction. To install such a ride, waterparks need around 100,000 sq ft.


Caption? ProSlide.com


22


JUNE 2012


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