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OFF TRACK | NUMBER CRUNCHING IN THE SADDLE


Let’s get statistical


How many bikes are being taken onto the continent (and back again) on Eurostar? Where do cycle thefts most commonly take place? And how many people took part in Bike Week events across the UK last year? All these questions, and more, are answered in your monthly briefing on random bicycle world statistics…


Phil Millard, Citrus-Lime


What bikes do you own? A 2008 Cannondale F2 in team colours with a fatty head. Not bouncy, but light. I am a bit of a Cannondale and hardtail fan boy.


Where’s your favourite place to ride? Cumbria – the Furness and Grizedale areas. Back in the day it was the Castleton/Hope ring in the Peaks.


What’s the biggest rush achievable on a bike? The uplift of scooting along, faster than the wind, just you and the mountains.


What’s your role at Citrus-Lime? I am the new accounts manager. My role is to speak to all our customers and help them with their questions, give guidance and listen.


Have you got a bike industry background? Just as a customer, I have been a mountain biker since 1993. My background is in independent retail and architecture.


And how can Citrus-Lime help retailers with their day-to-day business? Citrus-Lime works day-in, day-out to provide unique, cycle-centric ecommerce and Epos products which aim to allow bike businesses to punch above their weight with labour saving, and so money saving, software.


How can dealers get in touch? Leap to our website, at www.citrus-retail.com, or phone us on 0845 603 9254.


5,000


Last year Eurostar carried over 5,000 bikes – a slight dip, but broadly the same as in 2010, the operator told BikeBiz.


70%


Over two thirds of cycle thefts take place at the home, according to the latest Home Office statistics.


74 BIKEBIZ APRIL


BIKEBIZ.COM


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