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GALAPAGOS – WILDLIFE, ISLANDS & CALENDAR


Richly blessed with a collection of flora and fauna that is amongst some of the most unique found anywhere in the natural world, the volcanic islands of the Galapagos are as intriguing today as when Charles Darwin first set foot on the archipelago over 150 years ago. A pleasant year round climate also offers opportunities to enjoy the beauty of the islands and their wildlife at the best time to suit you.


ECOLOGY The remarkable islands of the Galapagos make up one of the best-preserved tropical archipelagos in the world. Its singular combination of marine and land based ecosystems has resulted in habitats so specialised that some endemic species are indigenous to just one island, with nearly 20% of the archipelago’s marine species being found nowhere else.


NATURALIST GUIDES Daily excursions are undertaken in the company of a naturalist guide, who will provide regular lectures and advise you on the requirements for each day, ensuring that you get the most from your visits. Each island is different, with the wildlife, landscapes and surrounding seas providing new experiences every day, which your resident guide will help explain. All of the guides are highly trained, fluent in English and licensed by the National Park.


LANDING/FITNESS Whilst fitness is not a strict requirement, you will need to be able to disembark from the tender boats (also known as zodiacs or ‘pangas’) that visit the islands. ‘Wet’ landings involve stepping through rocks and surf (‘dry’ landings are directly onto terra firma), so a certain amount of agility is needed to make the most of the daily shore visits. This is well within the capability of most clients however; the crew will always offer a helping hand.


GALAPAGOS CALENDAR January-March in the Galapagos


January sees the start of the rains and with it the arrival of nesting birds and green sea turtles. On the islands of Santa Cruz and Isabela, the iguanas begin their breeding cycles, whilst the rising sea temperatures herald the arrival of the waved albatross.


April-June in the Galapagos


As the rains subside the waved albatross arrive in ever increasing numbers. Land iguana and sea turtle eggs begin hatching and the water clarity makes for excellent snorkelling. May sees the blue- footed boobies begin their eye-catching mating displays.


July-September in the Galapagos


Cooling seas offer increased prospects for whale and dolphin sightings, whilst August brings the arrival of migrant birds and the return of giant tortoises to the highlands. September sees the penguin colonies off Bartolomé reach their most active period, meanwhile the male sea lions are fighting for dominance.


October-December in the Galapagos


October finds the islands echoing to the mating cries of fur seals. As sea temperatures rise, November creates perfect mating conditions for green sea turtles and, as the year ends, tortoise eggs hatch and the newborn albatross chicks start to fledge.


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It’s our experience that makes yours


ECUADOR


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