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Taktshang Monastery, Paro


THE TINY BUDDHIST KINGDOM OF BHUTAN AWAITS, NESTLED HIGH IN THE HIMALAYAS, AND BOASTS SOME OF THE MOST AWE-INSPIRING NATURAL SCENERY ON EARTH. ITS ISOLATION FROM THE WORLD HAS CULTIVATED A CULTURE RICH IN TRADITIONS AND RELIGION.


Dramatic landscapes, from snow capped peaks and deeply forested slopes to raging, boulder strewn rivers are found in the Kingdom of Bhutan, hidden deep in the Himalayas between India and Tibet. Explore the land of farmers, weavers and chanting monks.


PARO Paro lies amidst the forested valleys along the Paro Chu River. Graced with some of Bhutan’s oldest dzongs it is home to the strategically situated Paro Dzong and the remarkable Taktshang Monastery, the famous ‘Tiger’s Nest’ that clings to the craggy cliffs some 900 metres above the valley floor.


HAVEN RESORT, PARO


NEW Set amidst tranquil gardens and apple orchards, against the breathtaking backdrop of the Himalayan Hills, the


recently opened Haven Resort combines luxurious elegance and Bhutanese style. Its 24 rooms offer superb comfort, private balconies and full en suite facilities, whilst the resort’s excellent spa fuses the best elements of Thai massage and traditional Bhutanese stone baths.


UMA PARO One of Bhutan’s most chic hotels, the Uma Paro lies amongst some 38 acres of forest, close to the town of Paro. Described as a holistic and cultural adventure, the hotel has 29 rooms, suites and villas that provide some inspiring views of the surrounding landscapes of the Paro Valley.


THIMPHU Bhutan’s capital, Thimphu lies along the slopes of the Wang Chhu River Valley, amongst the spectacular landscapes of the Himalayas. Festooned with prayer flags, the Thimphu Valley is home to the 17th Century Taschicho Dzong and some of the country’s most important museums, temples and handicrafts.


TAJ TASHI HOTEL, THIMPHU Located in the heart of the capital, the Taj Tashi combines elements of Bhutan’s artistic and architectural traditions. The hotel offers a range of 66 luxurious rooms with contemporary comfort and stunning views across the city and the surrounding mountains. The Jiva Spa offers signature treatments.


PUNAKHA Situated in the lowest of Bhutan’s central valleys, Punakha is Bhutan’s winter capital; its warmer climate sees the fertile valley blanketed in cactus plants and orange orchards. Naturally and culturally spectacular, Punakha is set against the backdrop of snow covered mountains and pine-clad hills.


TRONGSA & PHOBIJKHA VALLEY Trongsa is home to the 17th Century dzong that was once the powerbase of the Wangchuck dynasty and is the ancestral home of the present royal family. The bowl-shaped valley of Phobjikha lies along the slopes of the Black Mountains and is an important wintering halt for the rare black-necked cranes.


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It’s our experience that makes yours


BHUTAN


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