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EGYPT, ARABIA & MOROCCO Wadi Rum, Jordan


FEZ, MOROCCO A city which has not changed for centuries, upon your arrival it will feel like you have travelled back in time. The oldest of Morocco’s imperial cities and a UNESCO World Heritage Site.


TURTLES IN OMAN Marvel at the sight of turtles hatching before scuttling towards the Arabian Sea.


Nizwa, Oman


WADI RUM, JORDAN Known as ‘The Valley of the Moon’ this spectacular desert is one of Jordan’s most dramatic natural settings and is simply stunning and not to be missed.


ESSAOUIRA, MOROCCO An easy going resort town on the Atlantic Coast – a great place to relax.


THE DEAD SEA, JORDAN Its salt waters lie at the lowest point on earth, some 400 metres below sea level and are revered for their mineral count.


MEKNES & VOLUBILIS Meknes hosts the tomb of Sultan Moulay Ismail, one of Morocco’s stunning monuments. Whereas the city of Volubilis is the most complete Roman city in Morocco.


ALEPPO, SYRIA With its citadel, souks and ornate Syrian mosques, Aleppo is the very essence of a traditional Arab city, great to explore.


NIZWA, OMAN One of Oman’s ancient capitals and of important cultural and religious significance. The Friday goat market is also a highlight for any trip to Oman.


MARRAKECH, MOROCCO Morocco’s top tourist attraction with an excellent range of authentic riads and outstanding souks.


Atlantic Ocean Shiraz Volubilis Rabat Meknes Fez Casablanca World Heritage Site


Musandam Peninsula


Dubai Abu Dhabi


Arabian Sea


Muscat Sur Marrakech Essaouira Ouarzazate


MOROCCO Erfoud


Walking in the Atlas Mountians Kasbah Ait Ben Haddou


Nizwa OMAN Job’s Tomb Salalah


BEST TIME TO TRAVEL Jordan’s climate is typical for the region with hot days and cooler nights. Winters can be cold with snowfall and the largely desert landscapes also leads to a sharp contrast in day and night time temperatures. The best time to visit is March to May and also September to November.


Syria has a more Mediterranean climate with hot dry summers and mild winters. February through April and also October and November are considered the best months to visit.


Lebanon is considered a year round destination with long warm summers which are cooled by the sea breeze. Winters are cool with snow falling in the high mountains.


Oman’s varied geography means it has a range of climatic conditions, but generally it’s hot all year round with little rainfall and an ideal winter destination. Southern Oman also has a much needed summer monsoon (July-August) called the Khareef.


Morocco is also a year round destination although summers can produce extreme temperatures, especially in open desert. The ideal time visit is between October and April when the climatic highs tend to average a more comfortable 30ºC.


08456 345 112 – Balesworldwide.com 29


Eram Gardens


Persian Gulf


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