This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
NEWS


Trades blame lack of advances in packaging for lagging behind...


Positive movement being made in the fight against single-use plastic, but lack of pace in the packaging industry slows the will of the people.


“ 1


A familiar sight across tackle and gun shops around the country... miles and miles of single-use plastic! We’re not singling out Korda here by the way...


Everyone needs to up their game!


We are monitoring technology advancements and as and when viable replacements become available, we will surely be acting,” says Kevin Nash. He’s talking about the use of plastics and packaging. And his statement rings true across both the shooting and fishing industries. Everyone is looking. He continues: “This is subject that we consider a great importance for the future of the planet and it is our desire and wish to switch all our packaging to materials that are environmentally friendly.” Sportsmatch, the UK-based scope mount specialists, knows all about the problems and pitfalls when it comes to packaging. Due to the nature of the product, it needs to be blister packed. Failure to do so means


6 | Tackle & Guns | August 2018


theft issues, and virtually no visible presence in a shop. It’s a must! Matthew Ford-James, managing


director of Sportsmatch, says: “The momentum is growing against the use of plastic – certainly single-use plastic. We’ve been let down by suppliers a couple of times and have even considered buying our own vacuum forming machinery to create our own blisters – but we’ve paused on this and are re-assessing the situation. It’s costly and momentum is building against plastics. Finding suitable biodegradable plastic is not an easy task though.” Nobody is finding a solution?


Well, not quite… Rig Marole boss Nigel Harris thinks otherwise. His company is currently looking at repackaging to be more environmentally friendly


– and he’s critical of the lack of movement in the trade by others. “There are a lot of alternatives to plastics out there,” he says. “From wooden spools to biodegradable plastic alternatives – there is no shortage. And it’s good. Really good. Once I started looking I came up with hundreds of firms offering really good stuff. There isn’t really an excuse.” But it’s costly. Or is it?


“What price do you put on the


environment?” asks Nigel. “If we can’t look after our own planet, we shouldn’t even be allowed to live on it. The alternatives I’m looking at carry a little more cost – I’ll absorb some. Some of it will need to be passed on. But my attitude remains unchanged. We have to care for the environment and there is no price we can put on that.”


www.tandgmagazine.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60