search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Focus on Health & Beauty


Make a lasting impression T


he health and beauty sector has seen some major developments in recent years, an injection of style being a major factor. Gone are the days where a standard uniform was grabbed off the shelf.


Grahame Gardnerʼs group sales director, Simon Ward, says: “We understand a uniform is much more than just a working garment and offers many advantages to both the wearer and the business. A well designed and branded uniform can also be used to create a brand identity for the business, and the right uniform will act as a carrier for the business that promotes pride in the wearer, and therefore increases staff performance and involvement.” Teri-Louise Deegan, marketing executive at Prestige Leisure, agrees. She says: “A uniform is important to businesses within the health and beauty sectors as it purports a sense of elegant professionalism. Seeing workers in a uniform gives any establishment an upmarket air, and will help to retain clients and gain footfall. As well as increasing the customer experience, it also helps staff to appear professional and well presented, falling in line with the expectations and perceptions of this industry.”


A role to fulfil


When it comes to helping your customers decide what style of uniform would be best for their business, it is important to remember that a uniform not only has to look good, but has many other roles to fulfil. “A uniform is designed to offer the wearer protection from hazards which may be present in the workplace, and a well-made uniform can be a highly effective piece of protective equipment,” explains Simon.


Laura Dutton, marketing executive at Premier Worker, suggests that you


Uniforms create a sense of elegant professionalism


should consider the practicalities of your customersʼ job roles during the decision making process.


“In this industry the clean and hygienic appearance of staff is particularly important as there is often close physical contact with clients during treatments. What is suitable for a nail technician performing intricate artistry at a desk may not be suitable for a sports masseuse who has physical demands. Sparkle and bling is great for some, whereas plain and


For an extra professional touch, advise


your customers to get personal with their staff uniforms.


–Laura Dutton, marketing executive, Premier Workwear


| 78 | May 2019


practical is necessary for others,” she says.


Once a uniform has been selected, now is the time to suggest branding and personalisation. The most popular method of decoration remains embroidery as it is a great way of displaying a company logo on a uniform. Traditionally, a logo is placed on the left chest, but now companies are getting increasingly creative with their logo placement.


“For an extra professional touch, advise your customers to get personal with their staff uniforms,” says Laura. “Sell them your print and embroidery skills and recommend that they get their salon name or team members names embroidered in their uniform. This level of personalisation is great for clients who may need reminding of the name of their favourite stylist from time to time.”


www.printwearandpromotion.co.uk


What a team wears can easily reflect how customers portray that business. Any vets, dentists, spa or beauty salon can influence their footfall by creating a professional look, backed up by a recognisable and trustworthy brand. Here the experts detail why a solid uniform makes all the difference in this sector.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88