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Focus on Transfer Printing & Heat Presses


Screen Print World Ever thought of printing plastisol transfers?


Itʼs actually a lot easier than you think. Once printed plastisol transfers can be stored away, put to one side, ready to use when you next need months after being printed.


Simply print your design on a piece of transfer paper then sprinkle some coarse transfer adhesive over the print. Remember to print your design in reverse! You can use fine adhesive powder to mix into the ink if you have issues with fixing. Then you need to ʻgel offʼ the print, this is not quite curing but not just a flash dry. You can do this by speeding up the belt on your tunnel dryer and turning down the heat slightly.


Once this is cooled you can then take it over to the heat press to apply to the garment. Once heat pressed, leave the transfer print to cool completely before removing the cold peel transfer paper. Dave Roperʼs top tip: If printing multiple colours. Pre-heat the paper and put it through the dryer first without any prints on. This way it the paper is going to shrink it will do so before you print and not in-between prints.


www.screenprintworld.co.uk


Hybrid Services A solution to meet any budget or requirement


Mimaki offers a range of transfer printing solutions, from the entry level TS30-1300 – a 1.3m dedicated dye sublimation transfer paper printer that delivers a strong combination of wide format performance and value for money right up to the incredible new Tiger 1800B MkII – Mimakiʼs industrial spec, ultra-high speed volume production machine, suited to manufacturing and high capacity installations.


The majority of the range is centred around delivering a solution for producing prints via the conventional dye sublimation method; where a reversed image is printed to transfer paper before being applied using heat and pressure to a polyester garment or fabric, or a polyester coated rigid item, such as a mug or promotional product. Brett Newman, chief operations manager at Mimakiʼs UK and Irish distributor, Hybrid Services, says: “We have a long and established heritage in dye sublimation printing. Mimakiʼs range of textile and dye sublimation printers is so extensive, we have a solution to meet any budget or specific requirement.” However, in addition to these, Mimaki also offers solutions for placement printing via printed and cut garment marking films, using solvent inks in its CJV Series integrated printer/cutters. The Mimaki CJV150 printer/cutter range includes models at four different widths, starting with the attractively priced, 800mm wide CJV150-75, significantly reducing barriers to entry for this sector and offering lucrative new applications.


A design produced using the Mimaki TS55-1800


Brett concludes: “Thanks to their automated workflow, intuitive software and highly accurate technology, itʼs possible to deliver long lasting, intricately shaped and vibrantly coloured transfers using standard sign making or display graphics kit as a new revenue stream, with the only additional investment being a flatbed heat press.”


The Mimaki TS55-1800 | 58 | May 2019 www.hybridservices.co.uk www.printwearandpromotion.co.uk


SPW Magnetic Release Heat Press


Screen Print Worldʼs new range of heat presses are affordably priced and perfect for print shops big and small. The Magnetic Release Heat Press in particular is a very sturdy and stable press which comes with a digital control for both temperature and time control. Special ultra- precision line technology, effectively ensures the uniformity of the heating plate temperature. The press also has a slide out base plate to ensure user safety when loading


garments. These heat presses are fantastic for applying plastisol transfers due to producing equal heat and pressure over the entire surface, and a magnetic release ensuring garments and prints arenʼt over pressed.


Magnetic Release Heat Press


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