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InSinkErator receives Good Housekeeping Institute approval


T


he M Series 66 food waste disposer from InSinkErator® has received the


highly sought-aſter Good Housekeeping Institute (GHI) Approved endorsement. The GHI Approved initiative is an unbiased, independent endorsement and to achieve the distinguished GHI Approved status, products must successfully pass the consumer quality assessment tests, which are conducted by GHI experts. The InSinkErator® M Series 66 food waste disposer was assessed and evaluated on its performance, ease of use, design and the user instructions. The renowned Good Housekeeping Institute has reviewed products since 1924, providing consumers with buying advice alongside its expert opinion. “Fast and effective at disposing of everyday


foods, the InSinkErator® M 66 is easy as well as convenient to use”, commented the Good Housekeeping Institute Expert. Anne Kaarlela, Marketing Communications


Manager, Europe and Russia InSinkErator®, says: “We are delighted that the M Series 66 food waste disposer has been endorsed by the renowned Good Housekeeping Institute. Our M Series range of food waste disposers is designed to offer an affordable, sustainable solution to reducing the amount of food waste in the kitchen bin, in an effort to encourage more consumers to invest in a food waste disposer for the first time. We hope that the GHI endorsement will highlight that even though the M Series is an entry-level range, the food waste disposers still possess tremendous functionality and versatility.” An InSinkErator® food waste disposer allows


food waste to be dealt with instantly, hygienically and in a sustainable manner, with the further benefits of saving space and improving cleanliness in the kitchen.


Hotpoint teams up with Jamie Oliver to tackle food waste


H


ouseholds are wasting £250 million worth of food every week catering for


different diets, with bread being Britain’s most wasted food item. New research commissioned by Hotpoint


reveals that Britons have to cook an average of two dishes each mealtime to cater for various household dietary requirements, contributing to over £1 billion worth of food a month ending up in the bin. UK households are throwing away 7 million tonnes of food every year – enough to fill 40 million wheelie bins, or 100 Royal Albert Halls. This month, as part of its long term commitment to helping consumers move to a zero waste kitchen, Hotpoint has teamed up with Jamie Oliver to get the nation to take on the Eat Your Fridge Challenge – seven days of being more mindful when it comes to cooking, eating root to stem where possible and committing to throwing away zero edible food waste. To help consumers take on the Eat Your


Fridge Challenge, Jamie Oliver has created new recipes, tips and food hacks all designed


8 | www.innovativeelectricalretailing.co.uk


to help consumers look at food waste in a new light. From broccoli stems, potato skins, even radish leaves this root to stem approach means that even the most forgotten parts of fruit and vegetables can be used to create delicious meals. The Eat Your Fridge Challenge is part of Hotpoint’s Fresh Thinking for Forgotten Food Campaign, which is now in its second year. As well as providing recipes, hacks and inspiration the campaign also showcases the brand’s innovative, high performance products that can also make a real difference when it comes to cutting back on household food waste.


October/November 2019


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