search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
SUSTAINABILITY IN ASIA


From far left: Serving sustainable food; growing more locally; sourcing cage-free eggs


As for the additional challenges of


sustainable sourcing operating somewhere as densely populated as Hong Kong? Reid emphasizes, “It’s hard but let’s not forget Hong Kong used to produce 60% of its consumed produce. The whole system needs to be re-built, re-invested in and supported. New food tech is also making this reality easier to achieve. We now buy all our salad greens from Genius Greens an aeroponic farm in Kowloon. The quality is better than any imported product too.”


The rise of agri-tech


High-tech agricultural initiatives such as urban indoor farms are making waves across the region as a solution to procurement issues. Matt Kovac, the Singapore-based executive director of Food Industry Asia explains: “The main challenge to sustainable sourcing for foodservice operators is the availability of ingredients where they operate. Take the example of French fries in Singapore – potatoes are not available in Singapore, and perhaps not even in [neighboring] Malaysia. It’s the same issue with meats and seafood.” This is where controlled-environment


farming steps in. “It makes it possible to grow [certain ingredients locally] on a scale to meet commercial needs, regardless of the climate, floods, droughts and other disruptions to the supply chain,” Kovac says. “And being within the same country of consumption means it shortens the supply chain and could reduce transportation


For more go to fcsi.org


and thereby food waste through damage.” Considering food security concerns and the rate of urbanization, perhaps it’s unsurprising vertical farms are on the up in cities across the region (it’s already home to over 500 plant factories according to The Asia Food Challenge report), however, they’re not a silver bullet. In Singapore, Kovac continues: “Urban farms can cater to a percentage of our demand for vegetables, but not for other staples such as meats, rice, sugar, etc. To enhance food security, we might have to return to our farming roots and set aside land (perhaps offshore islands) as dedicated farming areas to fulfil our protein needs.” Challenges aside, these innovative solutions are part of a bigger and smarter push for sustainability: “We’re seeing companies consider how they can minimize and reduce waste and resource use, how they can grow more with less land and water, protecting biodiversity, increasing the use of clean and renewable energy at production, storage and distribution, and making commitments towards helping climate mitigation…” Ultimately, investors, regulators and consumers will increasingly demand sustainability and reduced carbon footprint. “There are opportunities for companies who are first- movers and who recognize this and act fast. Climate adaptation is as important as climate mitigation, and forward-thinking companies are already reaping the benefits of moving fast.”


“Future-proofing supply chains”: Responsible sourcing and animal welfare Alongside initiatives to draw down carbon, in recent years and intensified by Covid-19 there’s a growing demand for more responsible livestock management. “Consumers are increasingly choosing food that is produced sustainably and ethically,” says Elissa Lane, co-founder and CEO of Singapore-based multinational consultancy Global Food Partners (pictured above). Working with businesses to implement cage-free egg procurement and production in Asia, Lane believes transitioning to higher animal welfare practices presents opportunities globally. “Not only are food businesses making commitments to sustainable and responsible sourcing, they’re also increasingly publicly communicating progress on their commitments to give credible and transparent information to investors, animal advocacy groups, suppliers and consumers. “On the other side of the supply chain,


improving livestock management is also key to the long-term sustainability of farmers in Asia. Major food businesses in the region have pledged to only source eggs from cage-free farms and are only doing business with farmers who meet this requirement. By transitioning to higher welfare cage-free housing systems, farmers can take advantage of this growing market opportunity, future proof and remain competitive.”


95


ASIA PAC


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132