search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
THE FCSI INTERVIEW


WHEELS WITHIN WHEELS


T


oday he is considered one of the most world-renowned foodservice consultants and designers, but had you asked a young Stephen Arnold FCSI what he wanted to be when he grew up you would have


received a very different answer. “In my teens, I wanted to become a professional racing cyclist. But I had to accept I was never going to be good enough,” he laughs. The Tour de France’s loss was, however, the foodservice sector’s gain. Since joining David Humble Associates in 1975 and eventually forging Humble Arnold Associates from that company with his long-time business partner, the late Andrew Humble FCSI, Arnold has built up an enviable reputation over the successive decades. Humble’s untimely death in 2018


was a huge blow, but Arnold continues to set standards for the sector from his Hertfordshire, UK-based headquarters and his love for the foodservice and hospitality sector is undimmed. Humble Arnold Associates celebrated its 50-


Stephen Arnold FCSI retains his drive in the pursuit of excellence, after nearly 50 years in foodservice consultancy. “This business is my life,” he tells Michael Jones


year anniversary in 2016 and continues to thrive, winning projects around the world across a range of sectors.


Family values


An intellectual curiosity for design and imaging how spaces can be utilized creatively, was perhaps, inherited. His father was a partner in an architectural practice and Arnold describes him as “a huge influence” on his career options when dreams of cycling professionally became unfulfilled. “I would study his space planning sketches and read his site meeting notes. Subconsciously, I wanted to emulate his achievements,” he says. While Arnold junior grew up enjoying


“good family food” he had, at that stage however, no specific interest in the hospitality industry. Art and technical drawing were his preferred subjects at school though, and these led him to pursue a career as a design technician. At that time, Arnold’s careers officer, who was a member of the cycling club he belonged to, told him about a vacancy at David Humble Associates, the respected


foodservice design consultancy practice formed in Radlett, Hertfordshire, in 1966 – based relatively close to Arnold’s home of Leverstock Green. “I was interviewed by David and Barbara Humble and offered a draughtsman position in June 1975. I joined the company on an initial salary of £18 per week,” he says. The owner’s son, Andrew Humble, joined the family business one year after Arnold, having been employed by Laing Construction in London, where he gained experience in site construction processes. “Andrew and I developed a strong working relationship,” says Arnold. “His family bought me into the business and we were always seen as equal.” As David Humble wound down his commitments, the two younger men eventually became shareholders in the early 1980s and took center stage in


“Our ambition was to build on a strong reputation. We were incredibly ambitious, but in a calm way"


further developing the business. “Our ambition was to build on the


firm’s strong reputation as kitchen and foodservice designers, particularly within the hotel, corporate dining and airport catering sectors,” says Arnold. “I did much of the hotel project work, while Andrew was more focused on the business and industry (B&I) projects. We were incredibly ambitious, but in a calm way.”


Reputation building As project work racked up and with increased exposure to high-profile hotel group clients such as ITT Sheraton


47


WORLDWIDE


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132