search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
INNOVATION


Aiming for net zero


CO2 N 102


et zero is a familiar phrase in every industry, as governments push to cut carbon emissions from their economies. However, does everyone understand what it means, beyond simply reducing carbon emissions?


In its purest form, net zero means that energy generated by on-site renewable sources accounts for all a building’s energy use. That is a rare occurrence, so some businesses off set their carbon emissions by buying carbon credits – essentially licences to pollute. “In order to be truly net zero, you also have to off set the generation and line losses for any power that is imported to the site during times when your on-site generation is defi cient,” says Richard Young at Frontier Energy, who is the director of the Food Service Technology Center (FSTC). “So, you actually need more on-site power generation than you think. You have to export about 3 kWh for every 1 kWh you import to make up for all the generation and line losses.”


That is a tall order and although net


zero has, for a long time, been a design parameter for buildings in remote, off -grid locations, it is relatively new to mainland urban areas. Furthermore, the offi cial defi nition wasn’t agreed until around 2016 and is still in a state of fl ux. Even in some net-zero buildings, the defi nition has not included the kitchen, so it is a new concept in the foodservice world. That said, Young believes the fi rst


net-zero restaurant has recently been created by McDonald’s (see box p107). “Net-zero targets are a reaction to climate change and led by government targets, legislation and CSR to ensure that an organization’s impact on greenhouse gas emissions is neutral at worst case,” says Ed Bircham FCSI, director of UK consultancy Humble Arnold Associates. “The UK, for example, has committed to net zero by 2050. Some organizations are trying to achieve this in 2030, but those decisions need to be made now. It will be a big ask to deliver it on those timescales.”


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132