search.noResults

search.searching

saml.title
dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
ALEGRIA


BEYOND EXPECTATIONS A


legria in Spanish means happiness. But for Filipino chef/owner Charles Montanez, the recent opening of his restaurant Alegria Singapore is an unexpected joy. For the 30-year-old, it feels like a surreal dream to


open his restaurant right at the heart of Singapore’s Chinatown area, next to the Michelin-starred Burnt Ends. The hip restaurant district is home to iconic restaurants like Cure, Zen and Potato Head. During the pandemic, the young chef witnessed


restaurants close in Singapore. In less than a month, a new one would replace it. Montanez realized that perhaps it was a good time to open a new restaurant. With more rental spaces available, it was a renters market. He was able negotiate a lower rent in the usually steep real estate prices in Singapore. In the middle of opening a second Alegria restaurant in Manila and awaiting a work permit from the Ministry of Manpower, Montanez was unable to return to Singapore during the build of this project. However, he entrusted his vision for Alegria Singapore to the expert hands of Eminent Foodservice Design consultants Ben Ho and Mildred Famero. Alegria is a home-grown Latin/Asian Fusion restaurant in Manila’s hip BGC district. Taking the


When Filipino chef restaurateur Charles Montanez wanted to set up in Singapore he couldn’t be on site. He tells Maida Pineda how appointing local consultant and FCSI Associate Ben Ho gave him complete peace of mind and a successful new restaurant


concept from Manila to Singapore means the concept is tweaked to a Latin/Filipino restaurant. Montanez had a vision for Alegria Singapore. “I like everything dark. That’s why the walls are dark and kitchen counters are all black.” Another thing that he wouldn't compromise on is the original mural, which he brought from the flagship store in Manila. He envisioned a more refined and elegant look for the Singapore outlet, while carrying the design elements of the flagship restaurant: the bricks, the wood panels, the seats, and the design of the furniture. Apart from the aesthetics of the restaurant, the open kitchen was non-negotiable. Montanez recognizes how dining out is more of an experience these days, “Having an open kitchen allows people to see how their food is being made and it allows the chefs and staff to express themselves.” The third non-negotiable for this project is the


Argentine Parrilla grill. The chef beams with pride while showing off his prized kitchen equipment, “If you notice the portion where there are bricks, that’s a Parrilla grill. It has an open fire, a wood fire on the right side and an adjustable griller on the left side. This is the mini version because they’re usually big. They roast whole pigs. But we’re not going to do that


> 75


ASIA PAC


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132