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CHARLIE & JOE'S AT LOVE STREET


Meeting that challenge meant “valuing every single inch of space and trying to utilize it the best way you can – vertically, horizontally, outdoors, and so forth,” Stilwell says. “It's like a galley kitchen in an aircraft. We fit in as much equipment as we could and tried to do it in a way that was, at the same time, extremely functional and able to crank out a lot of volume.” Volume was the key, as the operation has really taken off. “They have so much business they just don't know what to do with it,” Stilwell says. “Of course, because of the pandemic the biggest problem is getting the labor to execute, but as far as the efficiency of these facilities goes, I think they're very happy with it.” Though every inch was needed, “you still


have to follow the basics of smart flow of goods, service, and production and they all have to be done in an elegant and efficient manner,” Stilwell cautions. “Also, you have to keep trying to minimize wasted space. "In a situation like this, when you have a


huge bar – but no place to put liquor storage and a beer cooler when somebody wants a rotating section of beer, wine, and craft cocktails on 24 taps – the question becomes, where do you put it?” That vital question caused Stilwell to look


up. “I thought, ‘That's a really high ceiling. Why don't we build a mezzanine over the top of the bar and put the kegerator and liquor up there? And we can put windows in the kegerator and make it look like it was always intentional, like some kind of industrial pre- existing condition. So many people focus on the problem, they don't focus on the solution. You just have to do things like that: skyhook the beer keg, which is a bit of an unusual solution but did work out well.” In BEACON, the kitchen workhorses are the wood-fired grill and single-sided range suite from Montague. In Lucky Shuck, the workhorse “is definitely the bar because it is massive, and of course, it's so popular because it's on the waterside and offers beautiful views of a lighthouse and the Intracoastal Waterway,” says Stilwell. “That bar is jammed all the time.” BEACON’s kitchen is designed to be


For more go to fcsi.org


extremely efficient, he adds, with a double- sided range suite setup that allows for much more production than a traditional straight line. “It allows you to scale up and scale down your staffing in a much more efficient way as well. So, I would say those two are the things that really keep that engine going.” Another takeaway, Stilwell suggests, is not


to detach from a project too soon. “You have to stay with it. That is one thing Next Step Design always does well. We never go away. We don't just design a project, put it out on the street and let people do whatever they want with it.


"With this project, I think there were four different plumbers and five different construction managers. This can, potentially, cause a lot of continuity to be lost, but if you are there the whole time at least you can protect the quality of your designs and control the final outcome.”


“It's like a galley kitchen in an aircraft. We fit in as much equipment as we could and tried to do it in a way that was, at the same time, extremely functional and able to crank out a lot of volume”


Clockwise from above: The display kitchen in BEACON; Topside's rooftop bar; The Lucky Shuck kitchen; the Lucky Shuck bar


73


THE AMERICAS


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