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COVID-19 T


Above: Diego Rossi from Trippia, a modern trattoria in Milan


he push for sustainability


in foodservice has gathered momentum in the last decade. Chefs and operators have worked hard to reduce food waste, single use plastics have become unacceptable and there is an ongoing focus on reducing emissions. The recent report into the climate crisis, published by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, has vindicated those working for change – and much more is required from a sector that has a considerable carbon footprint. But can a restaurant call itself truly


sustainable if it doesn’t have the same laser focus on its people? There’s a growing sentiment among restaurateurs that sustainability in 2021 should extend far beyond climate credentials. “I think people are still uninformed


about sustainability. You sometimes hear them talking about it as reducing plastic use and food waste, which is great, but it’s much more than that,” says Davide Caranchini,


“In Trippa the team works eight hours a day… they have a life and this way they work better. If we spend 18 hours in the kitchen, we can’t think about what we are doing”


chef owner of Materia restaurant by Lake Como, Italy. “To me it means not only thinking ‘green’ and acting in an ethical way with food. Almost everybody now knows about no waste, and I think it’s normal to act in that way. Now, when we talk about sustainability we need to talk about economic sustainability and how to preserve a circular gastronomy.” It is a philosophy shared by fellow Italian chef Diego Rossi who owns the modern trattoria Trippa in Milan. “When we talk about sustainability we must talk about human sustainability,” he says. “In Trippa the team works eight hours a day; I understand that they have a life and this way they work better. If we spend 18 hours in the kitchen, we can’t think about what we are doing.”


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DAVIDE CARANCHINI Chef/owner, Materia, Lake Como, Italy


WORLDWIDE


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