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EAME


CITY FOCUS


Madrid Fusión shaping gastronomy In 2003 Madrid hosted the fi rst edition of Madrid Fusión, today among the most infl uential gastronomy congresses in the world. “It was the fi rst of its kind in Europe, a gastronomy congress with such an international scope,” explains Mateo. Every big-name chef, from René Redzepi and Ferrán Adriá to David Chang and David Muñoz has appeared at the congress. The event has superb instinct in spotting new talent. “If you consider the 20 most interesting chefs in Spain at the moment, look back and you’ll see that at one point each of them was named breakthrough chef at Madrid Fusión.” The annual event has been successful in forging a community spirit among chefs, says Mateo. “It is unique as an event where chefs really get together to network and it has given them a genuine sense of identity and pride in their profession.” Mateo says what


Clockwise from top left: A vendor at a traditional Madrid market; David Muñoz's DiverXO, Madrid's only three Michelin star restaurant; Chef Ángel León, from Aponiente opened this year's Madrid Fusión.


Left, far left and above: Miguel Carretero chef at Santerra in Madrid's affluent Salamanca district has a reputation for quality produce


For more go to fcsi.org


characterizes Madrid more than anything today is dominated by international trends. “We are truly global now and share trends with other cities – the focus on high quality produce, less formal fi ne dining and a clientele that is concerned about provenance and want to know where what they eat comes from – those are all global trends,” says Mateo. “Madrid is the only city in Spain right now with this level of gastronomic activity. It sits alongside New York, Berlin and Copenhagen, they are all very connected. Young chefs will go and work in the


THE MARKETETH MARKETS O MADRID


OF MADRIDF


Local markets have long been a feature of Madrid. Traditionally the place where people would go and buy their produce, recent years have seen many undergoing a makeover and the trend for gourmet markets has long been a feature of the city, which counts a total of 47 markets, 34% of them described as gastronomic. While some have completely changed and now exclusively feature food stalls and counters, eschewing the more traditional fruit and veg, meat and fish vendors, others, including Mercado de Vallehermoso, have aimed for a balance that preserves the traditional vendors while also introducing high- quality restaurants.


best restaurants and they return to open their own places here; bringing a new level of informality and fun.” The confi dence is echoed


by those operating in the sector. Miguel Carretero, executive chef of Santerra restaurant group, arrived in the city fi ve years ago. The recipient of several awards, including the coveted prize for the world’s best croquette at Madrid Fusión, his neighborhood restaurant in the affl uent Salamanca area of Madrid has become a destination restaurant with a reputation for quality produce. “Right now in Madrid, there are new openings that are more focused on the client,” he says. “I see people considering the long term when they open new projects whereas before it was more about fashions or fi nancial motives. Today people are betting on quality.”


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