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CAMERA TECHNOLOGY NET ZERO


Th pe


The concept of net zero no corporate social responsibility he


pervades government policy and bilit s


o now licy


strategies as the world tries to mitigate the eff ects on the


environment of carbon emissions. The foodservice sector is making eff orts to be part of the solution; s th


issi mak luti


Jim Banks examines the benefi ts and challenges of cutting carbonutting


e ben ng ca


“ELECTRIC KITCHENS HAVE BECOME


MORE PREVALENT IN THE LAST 20


YEARS OR SO, AND THIS ADOPTION CONTINUES TO ACCELERATE”


Electrification of the kitchen Fundamental to any net-zero eff orts in foodservice is the use of electric-powered cooking equipment, as this alone has the potential to be fully powered by renewable sources. “Two years ago, no one cared about


sustainability, and you had to do the hard sell with induction cooking,” says David Kaneda, managing principal at Integral Group, an interactive global network of design professionals working on deep green engineering. “Nowlegislation is forcing the issue. The restaurant industry, too, is realizing that climate change is a big thing, so we are in the middle of a sea change.”


Leading the way are


key industries, notably the technology sector, that have made sustainability promises part of their business strategy.


They are divesting their interests in fossil fuel companies, reducing energy


consumption and working with BREEAM and LEED sustainability standards in their buildings. For them, the kitchen is a key area to target for energy use. “Electric kitchens have become more prevalent in last 20 years or so, and this adoption continues to accelerate,” says Bircham. “This is due to improvement in induction cooking technology and most technological advances in electrically powered equipment, such as pressurized multi-pan cookers, but we have seen more clients asking for all-electric kitchens as they seek to divest themselves of using gas, oil or coal.” All-electric cooking means lower ventilation rates, as well as a reduced risk of fi re and poor air quality in the kitchen. In fact, it could soon become a legal requirement in some places. “California is going all-electric,” says Kaneda. “Cities have passed new building standards stipulating all new buildings must be all-electric with no gas. This could be extended to existing buildings.” In the US, this could mean


kitchens becoming more European. “In Europe, there’s less waste,” says Nahum Goldberg FCSI of NGAssociates Foodservice Consultants. “The US has had all the space and all the resources, but now energy is expensive, and labor is scarce. Induction is more expensive upfront than a gas hob. However, smart management of electric kitchen equipment can help to increase energy effi ciency.”


That cost-effi ciency could be key in


moving the foodservice sector towards all-electric cooking, but for some it is out of reach, and it means little without on- site renewable generation capacity. “It can mean keeping energy costs


as low as possible,” says Kip Serfozo FCSI, director at Cini•Little International. “Net zero seems hard and large corporations are doing it by buying carbon credits, or by using green energy


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