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TIMURBAY SEAFRONT RESIDENCE


Located in Sungai Karang, Kuantan, facing the South China Sea, the design emphasises on maximising the sea view so


85 per cent of the units face the shore. To blend the tall building with the surroundings, the architects created a layering effect—retail at the street level; four-storey podium with an inner courtyard; and linkways to the tower block.


MATERIALS Located by the sea, the materials used for the projects were chosen for their ability to withstand high salt content in the air. Such materials include higher grade stainless steel (alloy 316), galvanised railing and oxide paint for metal works. Alloy 316 is widely used in environments with a high corrosion risk, protecting surfaces from chlorides. External perimeter walls and internal walls, except for bathrooms, use precast wall panels, which were purchased locally to minimise carbon footprint.


ELECTRIC UTILITY Tenaga Nasional Berhad (TNB) requires accurate determination of the maximum possible demand for a newly proposed development, which also indicates the supply voltage and target network configuration. Network facilities are to be developed in phases, in tandem with physical development. Site selections for substations and feeder routes are determined at the planning stage to achieve optimal technical performance of network and costs. TNB also sets the standard requirement and sizes for the main distribution substation (PPU) rooms. This helps consultants to plan and design the spaces accordingly. The new PPU will also serve the existing surrounding residential development as well as the upcoming Phase 3.


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