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That being said, there is a silver lining. With the disruptions to the global supply chains, we are contributing to the demand for alternative local materials and products. Local manufacturers can benefit from this. Economies of scale will improve the production and pricing. Malaysian producers can gain a more competitive edge in regional or even global markets. This would provide more economical and easily available supply chain.


What do you hope to see in Malaysia’s construction industry in the next 10 years? I would like to see the construction industry move into automation even in physical wet works in a project. More Industrialised Building Systems (IBS) being used for building construction. However, to realise this effectively, we require support from the government and clients. The cost of investment for IBS needs to be recovered; hence slightly higher construction costs must be accepted by the industry in the short term. We also need to practise more environmentally conducive construction activities, which will create better sustainable eco-living in Malaysia.


What have you seen changing in the past 10 years? BIM or other applications have made construction activities more efficient and faster with significantly reduced risk of change later in the construction phase, as well as better quality and safety. Newer equipment advancements have also delivered projects that previously seem impossible. Evidence is plentiful in China where spectacular infrastructures projects were completed in record time. In Malaysia, we have our Rapid Pengerang Petronas project, which was executed in record value and time. We started to embrace the BIM evolution locally with the pilot MRT1 project; and have since fully utilised BIM in the MRT2 project for all interfacing scope, from design to the construction and installation phase. This has resulted in clear improvement to timeliness and risk of change.


The construction of PGU-I


PGU-I GAS PIPELINE (GRAPHITE)


The Peninsular Gas Utilisation (PGU) project includes a joint venture to install an approximate 33-kilometre- long NPS36 (36 inches) pipeline with associated pipeline facilities, together with abandonment and demolition of some existing facilities. The joint venture is between MMC Engineering and Construction Sdn Bhd (MMCEC), MMC Oil and Gas Engineering Sdn Bhd (MMCOG) and Sedia Engineering Works Sdn Bhd (SEW). The contract is worth RM120 million and covers the engineering, procurement, construction and commissioning of the pipeline, expected to be completed within 35 months from the effective date (starting in December 2019 and is slated to finish in November 2024).


PGU gas pipeline network sends gas for power plants and other industry customers across Peninsular Malaysia. The client, PETRONAS Gas Berhad, runs 2,623 kilometres of PGU network with the capacity to transport up to 3,500 MMSCFD of gas [million standard cubic feet per day] across the peninsula. The PGU-I GAS PIPELINE (GRAPHITE) will commence from Gas Processing Kerteh (GPK) and then terminate at a/the tie-in point in M1 Station. It is installed alongside the existing NPS3 (36 inches) loop 1 gas pipeline, NPS12 (12 inches) liquid propane pipeline and two NPS8 (8 inches) liquid butane pipelines in the same nominally 90- to 40-metre-wide Right of Way (RoW) for most of the 33-kilometre pipeline route.


Image by MMC


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