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COMMENTARY


Checking and inspection of MEP systems


Image by: Shutterstock.com/HacKLeR


Utility systems in buildings with low occupancy need to be operated with proper scheduling and at lower capacity to ensure that no energy will go to waste.


drives to vary demands according to the requirement. Second, the pumps were larger than what was needed to fulfil the daily mechanical requirements of the facility. These had wasted substantial electricity and water. As a solution, we installed energy-efficient chillers that can support the off-peak load and downsized the two sets of pumps.


The root of the problem is that the initial planning for the operation systems within the sports facility was not focused; not only the chillers and water pumps, but also the lighting and air handling units (AHU). Therefore, we recalibrated the plan to consolidate


14


operations within the same facility zone to cut down unnecessary operations of lighting and air-conditioning. We also reviewed and suggested improvements to the management of lighting zonings and AHU operating hours for rooms that are not commonly utilised. We deployed photo sensors in areas with sufficient daylight to automate lighting requirements according to the environmental parameters. Lighting power budget tabulation was also carried out to justify replacement with more energy-efficient fittings. Existing lightings that were frequently used but having less than four years of return of investment (ROI) were also replaced.


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