search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
JAPAN


FOR GOING OFF THE BEATEN TRACK THE HOKKAIDO HIKE


ROUTE: Akan-ko to Shikotsu-ko Onsen LENGTH: 42 miles This is serious hiking, trudging up and down peaks in Japan’s last major wilderness. Even the tour leaders only tend to do one of these a season. It’s a 10-day trek, and you can be walking up to eight hours a day and up to 6,500ſt above sea level, overnighting in small, comfy hotels. There are bears in these parts, too, so a trained guide is essential, and the best time to go is between July and September. You’ll find rare alpine flowers in mountain passes, hike through forests and wetlands, and face explosions of water vapour from dramatic volcanic vents. There’s the chance to spot wildlife too — sightings can include foxes, deer and eagles.


FROM LEFT: Hikers on the Yoshida Trail on the way up Mount Fuji; Mount Fuji from the north side of Lake Motosu as it appears on the Y1,000 note; Hayashi Naoki on the Yoshida Trail; sign on the Yoshida Trail


MOUNT FUJI


Takane no hana


Literally ‘flower on a high peak’; beautiful, but out of your grasp


FOR SHOWSTOPPING COASTAL GEOLOGY THE IZU GEO TRAIL


SHIKOTSU-KO ONSEN AKAN-KO


ROUTE: Tokyo to Shuzenji LENGTH: 26 miles The Izu Peninsula, a UNESCO Global Geopark, is only 94 miles southwest of Tokyo, but feels worlds away. Either side of the peninsula are some of the deepest seas in the world, which serve as fertile fishing grounds. Shimoda, on the peninsula’s southern extremity, is where Commodore Perry’s Black Ships first came to Japan in the mid-1880s, portending the end of samurai Japan. This six-day coastal walk follows the east and west shoreline — although another option is to follow the peninsula’s spinal mountains, made famous in Kawabata’s novel, The Dancing Girl of Izu. On clear days, Mount Fuji fills the skyline to the north.


FOR CONQUERING AN ICON MOUNT FUJI


KYOTO TOKYO FUKUOKA SHUZENJI


START & END: Fuji-Subaru Line 5th Station LENGTH: Eight miles Fuji is Japan’s highest and most elegant peak, a dormant volcano rising to a height of 12,390ſt. It can be hiked between July and September, and the most popular route is the Yoshida Trail, which starts out from the 5th Station (7,545ſt). From here, it can take around six hours to reach the top. An average of about 30,000 people tackle Fuji each day and it can feel crowded, particularly during Obon festival in August, but it’s still a great adventure. There’s good camaraderie between those climbing, plus the reward of reaching the very highest point in Japan. JL


YUFUIN


For more information about Walk Japan’s tours, visit walkjapan.com


May/Jun 2020 63


IMAGES: MARK PARREN TAYLOR


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164