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DENVER


SEE & DO RINO ARTS DISTRICT: This square


mile of hip galleries and graffiti murals is known as the street art capital of America. Come in early September for Crush Walls, Denver’s pre-eminent urban art festival where the world’s best graffiti artists create giant murals on the streets. crushwalls.org rinoartdistrict.org denvergraffititour.com DENVER BEER TRAIL: They don’t call this city the ‘Napa Valley of beer’ for nothing: on any given day, more beer is brewed here than anywhere else in the country. The Denver Beer Trail explores four boroughs and close to 40 tap rooms, including Wynkoop Brewery’s infamous Rocky Mountain Oyster Stout, brewed with Colorado’s old cowboy delicacy, bull’s testicles. denver.org RED ROCKS AMPHITHEATRE: Just 15 miles west of Denver, in the foothills of the Rockies, Red Rocks is surely the most beautiful concert venue in the world. An open-air amphitheatre, it’s surrounded by sweeping red rock cliffs, lit up on all sides; and has


126 nationalgeographic.co.uk/travel


perfect acoustics under sparkling mountain stars. The Beatles and Jimi Hendrix both played here. redrocksonline.com CHERRY CREEK BIKE PATH: Denver has more than 5,000 acres of parks and open space, and over 80 miles of pedestrian and cycle paths. The highlight is the Cherry Creek Bike Path, which runs for 40 beautiful miles from the city centre to the small town of Franktown. Spend some time at Confluence Park, where the trail begins, and maybe try your hand at a spot of urban kayaking on the manmade rapids. denver.org BUFFALO BILL: Bison once roamed the Great Plains in their millions. Today, there are only about 500,000 nationwide including Denver’s own official small herd, just west of the city in Genesee Park. Stop off at the grave of Buffalo Bill, the legendary 19th-century frontiersman and entertainer, while you’re there. buffalobill.org BAG A 14ER: Colorado is home to 58 14ers (local lingo for mountains higher than 14,000ſt), more than any other state. Most


you have to hike, or climb, but Mount Evans lets you drive all the way to the summit. Topping out at 14,264ſt, the Mount Evans Scenic Byway, which begins just a few miles west of Denver, is the highest paved road in America: and offers 360-degree views without even breaking a sweat. 14ers.com THE INTERNATIONAL CHURCH OF CANNABIS: Denver legalised marijuana in 2014, and whether you’re a toker or teetotal, the International Church of Cannabis is definitely worth a visit. The inside of this 114-year-old former church has been painted head to toe in psychedelic murals and hosts regular gigs, talks and community events. Make a beeline there, if nothing else, just to see the ‘vicar’ lighting up. elevationists.org THE SOURCE MARKET HALL: Featuring two market halls and 24 artisan retaurants and boutiques, The Source is, perhaps, the city’s coolest place to eat. Check out Acorn for award-winning modern Americana cuisine and Saſta for unbelievable Middle Eastern mezze. denveracorn.com eatwithsaſta.com


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