search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
SMART TRAVELLER


ON THE TRAIL OXFORD


Alice, Aslan, Lyra and Lord Voldemort — literary tales abound on a walking tour of the City of Dreaming Spires. Words: Sarah Barrell


1 THE STORY MUSEUM


Start off at this new addition to Oxford’s museum scene, which celebrates the telling of tales in all forms. Author Phillip Pullman co-narrates City of Stories, an audio-visual journey through the city’s literary history, with fellow University of Oxford alumnus and author Kevin Crossley- Holland. Meanwhile, in The Shed, audiences can watch stories being brought to life through puppet shows and theatre and spoken-word performances. storymuseum.org.uk


2 CHRIST CHURCH COLLEGE Take a tour of the college where Alice in Wonderland creator Lewis Carroll lectured in maths and keep an eye out for the little door in the Cathedral Garden said to have inspired the entrance to Wonderland. Go punting on the nearby Isis, where Carroll spun a surreal tale to entertain the college dean’s daughter, Alice Liddell — supposedly the inspiration for the titular heroine. chch.ox.ac.uk


3 BODLEIAN LIBRARY Although New College’s cloisters and Christ Church’s dining hall are Oxford’s most iconic Harry Potter film locations (the latter not actually featured but recreated in the films), don’t forget to visit the Bodleian; one of its wood-panelled reading rooms, Duke Humfrey’s Library, doubled as the Hogwarts library. The gothic vaulted ceiling of the Divinity School, meanwhile, was Harry’s hospital ward in the first film. visit.bodleian.ox.ac.uk


4 EXETER COLLEGE Phillip Pullman set much of the His Dark Materials trilogy in the city, having studied at this beautiful college. Exeter itself takes a lead role in the recent TV adaptation, as it doubles for Jordan College — Lyra’s first home in Northern Lights. Can you spot the gabled attic window from which she escapes dreary academic life? Within dashing distance: the Covered Market, another favourite Lyra haunt. experienceoxfordshire.org


5 6


3 4


1


2


5 ASHMOLEAN MUSEUM The author J R R Tolkien was both a student and professor at the University of Oxford, so it’s no surprise the city is littered with artefacts and addresses said to have influenced his most famous works, The Lord of the Rings trilogy and The Hobbit. Well worth a look are the gold Posie rings at the Ashmolean; the inscriptions on the inside of the hoops are said to have been the inspiration for the all-powerful One Ring. ashmolean.org


6 THE EAGLE AND CHILD By now you’ve earned a drink at The Eagle and Child pub, where Tolkien and C S Lewis met with other members of the Inklings literary discussion group (a document, signed by the authors, praising the pub’s ham hangs above a fireplace). Then head to Magdalen College, where animals carved into the cloisters are said to have inspired a scene in Lewis’s The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. nicholsonspubs.co.uk magd.ox.ac.uk


May/Jun 2020 27


ILLUSTRATION: MARTIN HAAKE


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164