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SMART TRAVELLER


NEW ROUTES


CROSSING PATHS


A new series of routes across Wales and Ireland will celebrate a shared Celtic heritage and offer a range of off-piste adventures close to home


Uniting West Wales and Ireland’s Ancient East, the new Celtic Routes project offers the chance to discover a side of the UK and Ireland that’s seldom explored, with an emphasis on long-neglected history and culture. This collection of coastal trails and underexplored


destinations throws up myths, legends and stories that have long permeated the region’s landscapes and cultures — and that’s before you even consider the natural beauty of these wild, windswept countries. The Welsh coastal counties of Carmarthenshire,


Ceredigion and Pembrokeshire and their Irish counterparts Wicklow, Wexford and Waterford have put together their best travel experiences revealing must-see destinations and roads less travelled. Culturally curious travellers can discover the ‘Celtic Beacons’ collection, which highlights historic sites, like Hook Head in County Wexford, where one of the world’s oldest operational lighthouses has stood for over 800 years, or the Devil’s Bridge in Ceredigion — three separate bridges over the River Mynach, with one built on top of another between the 11th and 19th centuries. For those looking for seasonal travel experiences, the


‘Celtic Moments’ are a series of places to visit at specific times throughout the year for a chance to experience unique festivals and occurrences. These range from dolphin-spotting off New Quay in Ceredigion in the summer, whales breaching at Hook Head in November to the spectacular Aberaeron Mackerel Fiesta in late August. Finally, there’s also a range of ‘Celtic Discoveries’ for history buffs, with castles, ruins and sacred stones unveiling tales from a shared past that binds these two nations. celticroutes.info LAURA PRICE


RIGHT ON TRACK: NEW CULTURAL ROUTES


BRAZIL A trail of more than 2,500 miles is being set out through Brazil’s Atlantic Forest. In São Paulo state, visitors can hike the Caminhos do Mar, which opened in February and mark several important moments in Brazil’s history. ingressosparquespaulistas.com.br


AUSTRALIA With rock art dating back more than 20,000 years, the Grampians National Park is a prime spot to delve deep into Aboriginal Australian culture. A 22-mile section of the Grampians Peaks Trail is now open; the rest will be completed by the end of 2020. visitgrampians.com.au


SWEDEN Stretching some 45 miles from Gothenburg to Alingsås, the recently opened Gotaleden trail has options for nine different legs of varying lengths and difficulty levels. For history and culture, try the easy Floda-Tollered route. gotaleden.se


NEW ZEALAND The country has just unveiled the 10th of its Great Walks, a series of trails showing off its most iconic spots. Developed for mountain bikers as well as walkers, the Paparoa Track on South Island has significant indigenous history. thepaparoa.co.nz


May/Jun 2020 21


Courtown Woodland walk, Wexford, Ireland


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