search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
SMART TRAVELLER


NEW ARCTIC TOURS


ICELAND & GREENLAND THE ARCTIC COLD CULTURE


The land of the midnight sun takes centre stage in a major new exhibition at London’s British Museum


The Arctic is changing dramatically. Oſten imagined as a timeless, frozen landscape, scientists believe the region could in fact be ice-free in 80 years. Temperatures there are increasing at twice the world average and last year was the second-warmest summer since records began in 1910. The impact of this is being seen in shrinking ice coverage, thawing permafrost and extensive wildfires. The Arctic’s staggering transformation is


at the heart of a new exhibition set to take place at the British Museum this year. Arctic: Culture and Climate has been curated in partnership with indigenous communities from across the region and is the first show to look at the Arctic from the perspective of its people. As well as exploring how contemporary groups are responding and adapting to climate change, the exhibition will also take visitors through the region’s fascinating anthropological history. Four million people live in the Arctic


— including 40 different ethnic groups — and evidence of human settlement goes back millennia. Far from being an empty


18 nationalgeographic.co.uk/travel ap


wilderness, the Arctic has a rich cultural tradition. Highlights of the exhibition include 28,000-year-old jewellery made from mammoth ivory and sewing needles carved from walrus tusks, which were discovered at an archaeological site in north- east Siberia. While providing a fascinating insight into a prehistoric community, the site was, rather poignantly, only discovered because rising temperatures have melted the permafrost. Elsewhere in the


exhibition, new artworks including an Inuksuk (an iconic Arctic monument of stacked stones) will be on display as well as immersive photography of the captivating landscapes. The imagery has a dual purpose: to bring the Arctic’s breathtaking beauty to life, while also serving to show us exactly what we stand to lose. britishmuseum.org GAIL TOLLEY


DON’T MISS The Inughuit


(Greenlandic) sled made


from narwhal, reindeer bone and driftwood. It was traded with explorer Sir John Ross on his expedition to the Northwest Passage in 1818.


This summer, glide through Iceland and Greenland onboard the luxurious liner Le Boreal. Offered by Abercrombie & Kent, this two-week excursion will be accompanied by mountaineer Alex Pancoe, fresh from completing the Explorers Grand Slam (climbing the Seven Summits and trips to both poles). Excursions include kayaking Tunulliarfik Fjord in Greenland and summiting Iceland’s magnificent Dynjandi Falls. 15 days from $15,995 (£12,425). 13-27 August. abercrombieankent.com


SWEDEN


Here’s a new way to see the Northern Lights — from the dizzying heights of a hot air balloon. Starting this winter, Off the Map Travel is launching the very first ballooning trip into the Arctic night sky. The experience will take you some 130ft in the air as the Aurora Borealis dances around you. You’ll stay at the Aurora Safari Camp, a collection of heated tipis nestled among the trees in remote Swedish Lapland. Three days from £2,275. offthemap.travel


RUSSIA Next year, the National Geographic Endurance will take to the seas for the first time. The state-of-the-art vessel has been designed to navigate the polar seas year-round without compromising on comfort. The ship heads to the remote Franz Josef Land archipelago and the Kara Sea for an Arctic trip that truly is at the edge of the world, taking in captivating Arctic wildlife and some of the remotest islands in the world. 24 days from $26,680 (£18,160). 28 June to 21 July 2021. nationalgeographic.com/expeditions


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164