search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
ONLINE


WHAT’S ONLINE


SWITZERLAND’S CRESTA RUN — WHAT’S CHANGED?


The legendary Cresta Run has now opened up to women, but what’s the experience actually like for a female skier? Words: Abigail Butcher


I’m digging my toes into the ground harder than ever before; my body doing a desperate ‘plank’ for all its worth. I’m straining to look ahead, yet part of me doesn’t want to: the ice tunnel looms menacingly, the walls passing fast, and with every drop in altitude, I’m picking up speed; the metal teeth attached to my boots doing little to slow my plunge. Through Rise, Battledore and Shuttlecock


I fly, wondering when this torture will end; ricocheting off one ice wall, sending me driſting uncontrollably into the other side, bashing my wrist and hips in the process. Finally, aſter a death-defying race down the Bledisloe Straight, under Railway Bridge and through Cresta Leap, I spy three blue lines in the ice that signify The End. Not a moment too soon. As my toboggan slows, I realise I’ve


held my breath for what seems like the whole 88 seconds of my first ‘dart’ down the famous Cresta Run in the ski resort of St Moritz in Switzerland. But I’m alive. I make my way up to a warm portacabin


where others await — my 40kg metal toboggan removed on a meat hook by an ‘arbiter’ (course helper), one of many strange terms I’m learning in this world of Cresta craziness. I sit down, wondering how I’ll manage to ride the run again. I’m usually fearless, yet I admit to myself that over the past minute and a half, I’ve been absolutely terrified. The ‘death talk’ (aka, safety video) we had an hour before the run did little to explain exactly what riding the Cresta Run was like. Soon, my fellow beginner riders Sean and Mark appear in the cabin, both in much the


same state as me, which emboldens me to ride again. You see, as a woman I’m in a privileged position. Until December 2018, women were only permitted to ride the Cresta Run for one day a year —the last day of every season. A 98-year rule prohibiting them from practising and competing was finally overturned in a narrow vote at the 2018 AGM. The iconic run has been the preserve of


men for so long that a sign on the changing room door proclaims ladies are strictly prohibited from entering. But now they can, thanks to the British military, which told the St Moritz Toboggan Club that it could no longer justify holding its Inter-Services Championship here unless the sport became more inclusive. READ MORE ONLINE NOW AT NATIONALGEOGRAPHIC.CO.UK/TRAVEL


TOP STORIES


Here’s what you’ve been enjoying on the website this month


FRANCE How culinary capital Lyon is looking to the future A look at the city’s ambitious new gastronomic attraction


36 nationalgeographic.co.uk/travel


USA What they’re eating in Tampa Bay We round up the dishes making heads turn in the Florida city


EUROPE Europe’s best cities for architecture From brutalist to baroque, six of Europe’s architectural beauties


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164