search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
25 MARCH 2018 HEALTHCARE INNOVATIONS


SPECIALIST CLINICS 15


Vision Correction London — offering the latest in lens replacement surgery


L


ens replacement used to be a procedure that you’d only think of when someone, usually in their 60s or older, had a cata-


ract (a natural clouding of the lens as we age); they’d undergo surgery to replace the lens, generally opting for a lens that would give them good distance vision, but would still re- quire glasses for reading. Today, as lifestyles change and those in


their 50s and older are far more active than previous generations — enjoying the theatre, eating out, sailing, climbing and skiing — our vision needs to be better than ever before. The hassle of switching between multiple


pairs of glasses for reading, driving and when the sun comes out, is something that’s causing more and more people to seek help. They want to enjoy the many lifestyle benefits that come when you don’t have to wear glasses at all. Now, the replacement lenses used in cata-


ract surgery or lens replacement surgery, just like all technology, have benefited from year- on-year improvement. There are a number of multifocal lenses


available on the market but the latest devel- opment is the trifocal lens — it’s currently the most popular on the market in terms of pro- viding multifocality to patients. Whereas previous multifocal lenses could


provide distance and near vision, modern trifocal lenses are able to better replicate the natural lens in providing distance, near and intermediate vision. As such, the range of vi- sion is more natural and allows recipients to see their computer as well as their smartphone while still maintaining their distance vision. The lenses also come in toric form, which means they can correct astigmatism (how the


Today, as lifestyles change and those in their 50s and older are far more active than previous generations, our vision needs to be better than ever before


eye focuses light) at the same time. Current lens technology is incredible, considering the limited options that were available only 10 years ago, and since there’s only one direction that technology tends to go, it’s safe to say there’s more to come in this field. Surgeons are always looking forward to


new developments and better ways of helping their patients to improve their quality of life. Vision Correction London has seen great re- sults for its patients using the best available multifocal and trifocal lenses. The surgery itself only takes 10-15 minutes


per eye and is usually performed under lo- cal anaesthetic administered via eye drops. However, sedation or even a full anaesthetic can be given if the patient feels particularly anxious about the operation. Patients can see straight after surgery but


their vision may remain a little misty for a couple of days. Soon the eyes adjust and pa- tients start seeing the benefits of the proce- dure. Recovery is quick and most people are able to return to work within a couple of days of having the procedure. It’s no wonder that more and more people


are opting for lens replacement surgery to get back the vision they once had.


A consultation with a specialist clinic and


expert refractive surgeon will allow you to navigate the best options available to ensure you get the best results.


Vision Correction London is offering readers a FREE consultation — usually worth £220 — plus £500* off lens exchange surgery. Quote code ‘HI2018’ to receive this discount. For more information, contact: T: 020 3369 2020 E: hello@visioncorrection.london visioncorrection.london


*If treating both eyes, or £250 if only having one eye treated


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56