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MEETING & CONFERENCE FACILITIES


STOP EMPLOYEES FALLING ASLEEP IN MEETINGS


Business meetings are essential for making plans, exchanging thoughts or ideas and


reviewing progress. However, sometimes they can be overly long with enormous time, cost and productivity implications, BRITA Vivreau discuss how proper hydration can reduce fatigue and increase meeting efficiency.


A recent survey of 1,000 UK office workers conducted by Wacom revealed that over half felt that their meetings were not a good use of their time, 43% switched off and 34% did not concentrate on what was being discussed, or worked on other projects while meetings were in progress.


Frighteningly, nearly a quarter of those surveyed confessed to having fallen asleep in a meeting. A big part of mitigating such issues is planning meetings effectively, keeping them short and sweet by setting an agenda, staying on topic and not inviting more people than needed.


Aesthetics However, facilities managers can play a vital role in this too, by ensuring meeting rooms are aesthetically appealing, comfortable and luxuriously equipped. This drives employee wellbeing and productivity, keeping them fresh and engaged in meetings. It also impresses


52 | TOMORROW’S FM


people visiting the office and potential clients. If facilities managers can achieve this in an environmentally-friendly way then so much the better; sustainability is and will remain a top priority for businesses.


Décor and furniture are important in creating first-rate meeting rooms.


Of course, style, décor and furniture are important in creating first-rate meeting rooms, but another way companies can deliver premium facilities is by investing in mains-fed drinking water dispensing systems, such as those supplied by BRITA Vivreau.


These systems look contemporary and professional and provide an unlimited supply of high quality drinking water, which encourages employees and visitors to drink


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