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MAJOR REBRAND FOR ROBERT SCOTT


Tomorrow’s Cleaning Editor Martin Wharmby speaks with Alastair Scott, Sales Director at Robert Scott, about the changing face of the brand.


One of the UK’s largest manufacturers and suppliers of cleaning products, Robert Scott, has invested in a major brand refresh.


Founded in 1925, the fourth-generation family business employed creative agency Studio North, based in Manchester, following an in-depth strategy process including employee and client interviews and a number of brand workshops.


Along with a new company logo and focus on cleaning know-how, the project has been geared to focus and consolidate Robert Scott’s identity, following a number of acquisitions over the years and a dilution of the Robert Scott brand itself.


We paid a visit to Robert Scott’s Oak View Mills head office in Saddleworth, Oldham, to speak with Sales Director Alastair Scott about the rebrand and the future of both the business and industry.


Tomorrow’s Cleaning: What went into the


rebranding process, and how deep does it go? Alastair Scott: We definitely didn’t want it to be simply a visual image – rebrands for many just means a new logo. We wanted to dig a lot deeper and find out what people thought of us as a company, because the brand has to represent that. It doesn’t have to represent what we think it is, it has to represent what other people think it is.


As I keep saying to my fellow directors, the logo’s maybe five or 10% of it really, it’s just the visual aspect of who we are. It sits across everything we do, but it’s not a case of trying to reinvent ourselves to be what the market wants us to be, it’s just more accurately and more visually portraying what we are anyway, and what our customers think we are.


www.tomorrowscleaning.com


So, for example, they think we’re very helpful and we’re very pleasant to deal with, so it needed to be bright and friendly to reflect that. You can’t be friendly just because the customer says they want you to be friendly – you either are or you’re not, it’s as simple as that.


You’re only a few years away from the company’s 100th Anniversary – why have a


major rebrand now? Because we didn’t want to wait another seven years! The time was right to do it now. We might have a bit of a party in seven years to mark the occasion, but we didn’t want to delay this process longer because we believe it is a part of future proofing the company. We’ve got a critical mass of business and customers saying “You don’t shout enough about what you do, and we’re quite proud to sell your products.” So it felt like the right time to re-distinguish ourselves in the marketplace. We had a lot of brands, a lot of confusion that we wanted to clear up. We’re proud of our heritage but also have big plans for the future. We want our customers to see this commitment with our new brand direction and product range.


Are there any plans to expand or even move


away from Lancashire following the rebranding? We’re always looking to expand but no, we’ve never planned to change sites, we’ve got such a great workforce it would be so disruptive to move them somewhere else.


It’s about maintaining our sustainable family business and ensuring it will be here for another 90 years plus. All the jobs that have been created in the local community, it’s making sure they’re secure and are going to be here for the


WHAT’S NEW? | 17


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