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Upbeat’s Spring Guide#1


SONOMA, CA. ~ Stephan Stubbins, co-Executive Di- rector and Chief Marketing Officer of Tran- scendence The- atre Company, has announced he will step down from his role in February. Tran- scendence is best known for its “Broadway Under the Stars” perfor- mances in Jack London State Historic Park, as well as its edu- cation, outreach, and service proj- ects throughout Sonoma County and the North Bay.


Stubbins married Broadway ac- tress Libby Servais, one of Transcendence’s per- formers, in August of last year. Stubbins and Servais will be establishing their primary residence in New York City this spring, yet plan to be back in Sonoma throughout the coming years.


Stubbins will remain on


the Transcendence Board of Directors and will con- tinue to contribute to the company’s success from his new residence in New York City. Brad Surosky, co-Executive Director, will be stepping into the full


role of Executive Director, and Heather Montgomery will be stepping into the


budget from $83 to over $4 million.


Stubbins is a charter member of the Sonoma Sun- rise Rotary Club, served as a Super Ambassador of the Arts for Sonoma County Tourism’s CTA program, and was named one of North Bay Business Journal’s “40 Under 40” for his leader- ship at Transcen- dence. “Sonoma is my favorite place on earth. I am for- ever grateful and forever humbled by the generosity and kindness of this community. We arrived in Sonoma in 2011 with such


role of Director of Sales & Marketing. Stubbins left the Broad-


way production of Mary Poppins in 2009 to help found Transcendence The- atre Company with Amy Miller and Brad Surosky. In 2011, Stubbins moved full- time to Sonoma to co-pro- duce Transcendence’s first performance at Jack Lon- don State Historic Park, and over the course of a decade has co-lead the company to reaching over 200,000 patrons, contrib- uting over $515,000 to the park, and growing the


Live with intention. Walk to the edge. Continue to learn. Play with abandon. Choose with no regret. Laugh! Do what you love. Love as if this is all there is.


Mary Anne Radmacher-Hershey No winter lasts forever; no spring skips its turn. ~ Hal Borland UPBEAT TIMES, INC. • March 2020 • Pg 21


giant dreams, and to see them come true has been


FRIEND OF UPBEAT TIMES AND GREAT PERFORMER STEPHAN STUBBINS TO STEP DOWN FROM CO-EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR POSITION AT TRANSCENDENCE THEATRE COMPANY


UPBEAT TIMES, INC. • March 2020 • Pg 21 Fun Facts & Trivia #6


one of the greatest joys of my life,” says Stubbins. “I hold close to my heart all of the phenomenal peo- ple that have contributed to making Transcendence the thriving organization it is today. I’m especially proud of the immense im- pact we’ve been able to make together in the com- munity through our count- less education, outreach, donated tickets, service projects, and kids pro- grams.” “The company is in such wonderful hands under the leadership of Brad Surosky (Executive Director), Amy Miller (Ar- tistic Director), and Andrew Koenigsberg (Managing Director). I look forward to participating on the Board of Directors as we build upon this amazing legacy our community has cre- ated together.”


Gender equality was an unheard of term centuries ago. In the medieval world, it was a widely accepted fact that it was


disgraceful for women to go and perform on a stage. Actors often played the role of female characters on stage. It was during the English Restoration of 1660, when women started participating in onstage performances.


To gain more money, actors or actresses have to work not only on the film set, television, stage, or even video, they can be seen working on the theme parks, nightclubs and cabarets.


The most curtain calls ever for a ballet was 89, after Rudolf Nureyev and Margot Fanteyn performed their 1964 Swan Lake in Vienna.


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