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8 NEWS AWARDS World Architecture Festival winners 2019


10 innovative designs addressing some of the world’s biggest challenges have won awards from the World Architecture Festival (WAF). The 2019 WAFX Awards celebrate proposals from across the globe – tackling subjects ranging from ageing and health to cultural identity and carbon reduction. This year’s category winners include a humane prison design in Belgium, which challenges traditional layouts; a ‘horizontal’ skyscraper in the heart of Moscow which re-uses existing buildings; repurposed oil tanks creating a new river-front park in Brooklyn; and a pedestrian-focused ‘urban living room’ for the UAE’s longest road.


The winning schemes will be on display


at the World Architectural Festival in Amsterdam, which takes place from 4 to 6 December. The overall 2019 WAFX winner, chosen from the category winners, will be presented at the WAF Gala Awards Dinner on Friday 6 December at the Beurs van Berlage. WAF programme director Paul Finch commented:, “This year’s winners display high levels of ingenuity and lateral thinking, and demonstrate the power of design and designers to tackle the world’s big problems in ways that can turn them into opportunities.” The WAFX 2019 Category Prize Winners are:


masterplan is for a holistic strategy, encompassing landscape design, ecology, engineering and socioeconomics, to help the lake and its environs recover from this neglect, while re-engaging the community to support its preservation. The strategy recognises that “pollution must be tackled at source, and that a phased approach to regenerating the lake is critical; continually moving towards the end goal of a catchment-wide suite of interventions to improve sanitation, drainage, stormwater management, and promote walking, cycling and ecological value. In the future, the polished water will form a backdrop to vibrant city life, celebrating the innovative future of Bangalore.”


Ulsoor Lake


Water and Food joint winners: Ulsoor Lake by Arup and The Tanks at Bushwick Inlet Park by Studio V Architecture


Ulsoor Lake by Arup


Ulsoor Lake is one of the largest remaining open spaces in Bangalore, however it has not been developed in line with the city’s rapidly increasing population and is subject to many pollution threats. Arup’s


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The Tanks at Bushwick Inlet Park by Studio V Architecture Located at Bushwick Inlet Park, on the Brooklyn waterfront, The Tanks is a “real proposal for New York that radically reimagines what a public park in the 21st century can look like”. Nestled against a rare green inlet on the East River, the Bayside Oil complex features 10 empty oil tanks that have been empty for half a century. Each tank is unique and the design vision adaptively reuses the structures as community gardens, performance spaces, galleries, and environments for natural habitats. The overall park will feature public green space, play areas, athletic facilities, plus an ecological inlet with native species and community boating. Joining the design is a non-profit dedicated to re-growing the devastated oyster population in New York Harbour. The project is a collaborative and entirely ‘pro bono’ effort that involves community groups, city agencies, and the Mayor’s office.


Re-use winner: Badaevskij Brewery Redevelopment by Herzog & de Meuron and APEX Project Bureau The aim of the Badaevskiy Brewery project is to redevelop the six-hectares old factory area, between the Moscow River and the vector to Minsk, and to transform this famous but largely abandoned and rundown site into a vibrant destination point in central Moscow. The factory


grounds and river embankment are to be opened to the city for the first time; the old industrial structures are to be assessed, restored and brought back to life through new internal organisation and uses, and more than 100,000 m² of new residential, office and retail is to be added in order to rejuvenate the site. The new development will comprise three renovated existing historic buildings and a new ‘horizontal skyscraper’, sitting on a series stilts, elevated 35 metres above the ground. This new structure brings a series of benefits, such as additional green space, retaining the connection between the existing buildings and the river, and the prime views of Moscow from the flats within the ‘hovering’ structure.


X-Space | Urban Fabric Regeneration


Smart Cities winner: X-Space | Urban Fabric Regeneration by Verform


This concept for an urban regeneration project in Dubai aims to create a new ‘urban living room’, based along a 1 km section of the Emirate’s main highway, Sheikh Zayed Road. “The human-scale space is geared towards pedestrians rather than vehicles, and is designed for all cultures to congregate,” said the awards organisers. The urban intervention is a response to how the highway is “breaking up the fabric of the city,” and is “designed to give back public realm, along with sustainable green areas, to encourage diversity, integration and tolerance”. The project’s aim is to reduce the use of cars, with cycle paths, public transport and light-weight vehicles. The design is across a ground level of open spaces and gardens and an upper level with workplaces, restaurants and a gym, both centred around a tree symbolising stability and peace.


ADF OCTOBER 2019


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