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4 NEWS


Managing Editor James Parker jparker@netmagmedia.co.uk


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On a completely different theme, Gavin Maloney of Arup, in our design-in-action article ‘Site Lines’ looks at how a house made of cork in Berkshire provides an answer to the reusable materials agenda, in a sensibly easy construction solution. Crucially, the building, with its exposed structural cork walls, is carbon-negative. It also provides a pleasing, although unusual, type of tactile materiality, which may be an acquired taste, but offers scope for other applications.


Similarly to Katy’s article however, the issue here is that, although it’s eminently possible to build a variety of schemes using solid cork, what are the structural issues across the industry that might prevent us from adopting such a sensible approach, and freeing up the possibilities? It might be as much to do with the ‘not invented here syndrome’ as much as money.


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The ‘NIHS’ effect, somewhat sardonically, holds that organisations will reject ideas particularly based on the fact that they haven’t done it before, and that they have come ‘from outside.’ However, given all of the challenges we face, from Brexit to the climate change agenda, the latter of which will of course require much longer-term solutions, we need to keep our minds as open as possible to the opportunities and alternative approaches.


This does not of course rest solely on architects, who, if anything, tend to apply lateral thinking almost as a way of life! Potentially, however, it needs to start with them.


James Parker Editor


10.19


ISTANBUL AIRPORT, TURKEY The world’s biggest airport terminal building yet is the product of a three-way architectural collaboration that brings uplift for all passengers


REPUBLIC, DOCKLANDS The latest phase of a major office scheme is a canny refurb by Studio RHE


ON THE COVER... Istanbul Airport’s new terminal is not only notable for its size, but for the way it provides striking architectural forms. The vaulted roof is constructed of repeating modular steel forms that echoes Istanbul’s traditional architecture. Cover image © Jim Stephenson For the full report on this project, go to page 36


FROM THE EDITOR


P


artly in an attempt to turn away from the depressingly grisly goings-on in Parliament, but also to ensure that we retain a proper focus on the world of architecture, I wanted to highlight some of the great features that we have in ADF this month.


However, it’s not to say that we only cover the positives, or just the uplifting examples of good design. In our View Point this issue, architect Katy Barker takes a strongly-worded look at the current roles of architects, and suggests they have boxed themselves into a corner as professionals.


She says that the broad skills architects possess would make them ideally fitted to being project managers, for example, but the anti-collaborative ‘blame culture’ of construction has prevented this. Barker herself has made a success of escaping a narrow ‘Design’ role and moving into the ‘Build’ of Design & Build. However unlocking all the gates to free architects already embedded in their silos might be a complex, although worthwhile endeavour.


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ADF OCTOBER 2019


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