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18 NEWS


LONDON BUILD


Event to focus on women in construction


London Build (Olympia, 27-28 November) has been celebrating women within the construction industry since 2015, hosting an annual Women in Construction networking attended by over 1,200 women working across all sectors – making it the UK’s largest meeting of Women in Construction. This free-to-attend session gives


professionals the opportunity to learn from a panel of established experts and “rub elbows with some truly inspirational women who have made a significant impact on the industry.” The event will look at issues of gender


imbalance and inequality within the built environment, as well as highlighting the outstanding achievements of those who are driving change across the industry. Kicking off at 10.30 am on day two of London Build (28 Nov), we’ll see the Women in


Construction panel take over the main stage – an upgrade from 2018 in order to accommodate the ever-increasing audience. Moderated by Cristina Lanz Azcarate, London and South East Chair - NAWIC, the panel will feature five renowned speakers: • Ruby El-Kanzi, senior design manager I Construction London – Wates


• Pamela McInroy, equality, diversity & inclusion manager – High Speed Two


• Sharon Duffy, head of transport infrastructure engineering – Transport for London


• Michelle Hands, director – N J Engineering


• Michaela Wain, managing director – We Connect Construction


After the panel, the event will move to the


Built Environment Networking Hub – a chance to network with established experts including the event's Women in Construction Ambassadors and discuss the untapped opportunities for both women and men working in construction, diversity and equality.


Becoming a Women in Construction Ambassador Part of London Build’s commitment to amplifying the voices of Women in Construction is its active recruitment of professional and talented individuals driving change within the construction industry. “We


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


seek out ambassadors to represent the extraordinary skill sets and expertise the industry has to offer. Both women and men are welcome!,” said the organisers. London Build focuses on showcasing the


advantages of being a woman in construction, and strives to have a strong female line-up in its content programme. This mission to ensure that businesses


within the construction industry have every opportunity to thrive, by telling inspiring and motivating stories from exceptional women, is something that we encourage industry professionals to become a part of. You can get involved by joining industry-


leading names such as Christina Riley, Angela Brady, Alison Coutinho and Angela Dapper in becoming a Women in Construction Ambassador. By promoting the Women in Construction Networking Event and London Build to your contacts, you’ll have a WIC Ambassadors’ badge, priority seating at the conference, first-hand introductions during the networking event to help you gain an active role in promoting the WIC initiative and keep striving to make incredible change in the UK’s construction industry. The organisers concluded: “Anyone of any


gender who is passionate about driving change in the UK’s built environment, from students to architects to CEO’s, is welcome to get involved.” To find out more or to sign up, visit www.londonbuildexpo.com/wic


ADF OCTOBER 2019


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