search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
EXTERNAL ENVELOPE Taking responsibility


Martin Bidewell of Sika discusses why supply chain accountability must be standardised across the industry for safer roof refurbishment


wo years after the Grenfell disaster and 18 months on from the Hackitt Report’s call for greater clarity of guidance and regulations for construction, safety has become a primary factor in specification decisions across all elements of a building.


T


The tragedy and the subsequent report have been a catalyst for new safety legislation. Just as significantly, they have also nurtured a culture of safety that is prompting specifiers to consider products’ fire safety credentials throughout their lifecycle, including both the build and operational phases.


Where legislation is not immediately forthcoming, it falls to industry bodies and product manufacturers to self-regulate and drive best practice to maximise safety for both contractors and the public during construction, and for end users following completion.


One of the tangible ways that this is happening in the roofing sector is through the NFRC’s (National Federation of Roofing Contractors) Safe2Torch Guidelines, which are designed to manage the fire safety hazards associated with the specification and installation of bituminous roofing systems.


What are the guidelines? Although they are not mandatory, the Safe2Torch guidelines have become the recognised industry standard for safer installation of bituminous roofing systems since they were introduced in 2017. They have also supported innovation in the sector and have also been instrumental in the product development process for some product manufacturers.


The guidelines bring clarity to where it is safe to use flame-based hot works and where torch installation must be avoided, and using a self-adhesive bituminous membrane is a convenient and robust option. For specifiers, this means looking for a complete roofing system that includes both a torch-on membrane and a


self-adhesive membrane or flame-free alternative. All elements of the system should offer the same level of guaranteed performance, in terms of both installation integrity and service-life.


The specification should clearly set out the Safe2Torch zones and the torch-free areas where a self-adhesive membrane must be used, with the aid of hot air welding equipment where required to activate the adhesive.


What are torch-free zones? It’s important to work with a roofing supply chain partner that offers a site survey to map the Safe2Torch and torch-free areas of roof for each project. This is because identifying all the Safe2Torch zones can often be complex and require an understanding of the existing roof build up, the layout of the roof, and the proximity and fire risk of surrounding structures. The supplier should then also ensure this information is written into the technical specification and procurement documentation, and that the installation is regularly inspected to ensure Safe2Torch


ADF OCTOBER 2019


Although they are not mandatory, the Safe2Torch guidelines have become the recognised industry standard for safer


installation of bituminous roofing systems since they were introduced in 2017


73


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100