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GREEN VILLA, THE NETHERLANDS MVRDV


MVRDV and Van Boven Architecten have designed a small office and residential building on a corner lot next to the Dommel river in the Dutch village of Sint-Michielsgestel. Located on the town’s southern edge, the four-storey Green Villa adopts the urban form of the neighbouring buildings. The design developed by MVRDV and co-architects Van Boven Architecten continues the formation of the street frontage on Adrianusplein, adopting the mansard roof shape of the previously constructed buildings. Within this shape, however, the Green Villa diverges drastically from the other buildings on the street in its materiality; a “rack” of shelves, of varying depths, hosts an abundance of potted plants, bushes, and trees such as forsythias, jasmine, pine, and birch.


BABYN YAR HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL CENTRE, UKRAINE


QUERKRAFT ARCHITEKTEN


NIEDERHAFEN RIVER PROMENADE, HAMBURG ZAHA HADID ARCHITECTS


Designed by Zaha Hadid Architects, the upgraded 625 metre Niederhafen river promenade located on the Elbe River between St. Pauli Landungsbrücken and Baumwall in Hamburg was integral to the city’s flood protection system. The promenade offers generous public spaces for pedestrians, joggers, street performers, food stalls and cafes. Wide staircases resembling small amphitheatres are carved within the flood protection barrier at points where streets from the adjacent neighbourhoods meet the structure; giving passers-by at street level views of the people strolling along the promenade at the top of the barrier as well as views of the masts and superstructures of ships in the Elbe. Pedestrian areas of the promenade are clad in a dark, anthracite-coloured granite that contrasts with the light grey granite of the staircases.


An expert jury have unanimously selected the winning architectural design project for the future Babyn Yar Holocaust Memorial Centre, to be built on the site of the 1941-1943 atrocity in Kyiv, Ukraine. The winning design was submitted by the Austrian architecture bureau – Querkraft Architekten – with the landscape architect Kieran Fraser Landscape Design (Austria). The ground- breaking centre will be the first Holocaust Memorial in Eastern Europe. The concept of the winning project is built around the future centre visitor’s individual perception of the Holocaust. The design solution, said the centre, “enables the visitor to physically feel the danger and hopelessness that surrounded the victims gunned down at Babyn Yar”. A long ramp resembling a ditch or fissure leads to the core exhibition located 20 metres below the ground level. The walls of the ramp rise up around the visitor, ultimately encasing them underground. The journey made by visitors mirrors the path taken by victims towards the place of their death in the Babyn Yar ravine, whilst also “reflecting society’s incessant plunge towards the darkness of violence”.


ADF OCTOBER 2019


WWW.ARCHITECTSDATAFILE.CO.UK


© Piet Niemann


© MVRDV


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