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16 NEWS RETAIL


Bohlin Cywinski Jackson designs clothing retailer’s largest store in Brooklyn


Bohlin Cywinski Jackson have completed their design of Everlane’s newest and largest store to date, in the heart of Williamsburg, Brooklyn. Located at 104 North 6th Street, the space is a redesign of an existing 1960s, two-story brick building.


The large storefront invites customers in


with a “monumental” 20 ft tall glass wall allowing natural light to fill the space. Inside, the double height space welcomes guests to explore over 2000 ft2 floor and an additional 700 ft2


on the first on the


mezzanine. Guests are guided from the first level to the mezzanine by a grand stair


designed with precast terrazzo treads, a glass guardrail and a maple wood handrail. The ceiling incorporates a deep louvered scrim that “appears as a neutral plane,” said the architects, while masking the mechanical and electrical system below the existing building’s uneven structure. One of the primary drivers behind Bohlin Cywinski Jackson design was “guest experience”. In developing the “in-person shopping experience,” Everlane aimed to reduce wait times for fitting rooms, increase capacity and provide privacy during fittings. In the Williamsburg store, a series


of vertical maple louvers screens the fitting rooms from the main sales area, providing “privacy and warmth,” said the firm.


ThirdWay extends former Old Street warehouse COMMERCIAL


London-based architectural practice ThirdWay Architecture has completed a two-storey office extension to a former Victorian warehouse at 34-38 Provost Street, near Old Street roundabout. The building was fully pre-let before completion, and covers 15,000 ft2


of


commercial office space, across ground, lower ground and five upper floors. The brief required a two-storey extension as well as a complete refurbishment, in a design that “celebrated the story of the original Victorian building, accented and enhanced by contemporary additions,” said the architects. Founding director at ThirdWay, Liam


Spencer, described the commercial drivers: “Enabling our client to attract the widest range of tenants was at the forefront of our design process, and as such, we were keen to provide a range of unit sizes. It was important that we provided a design that had the flexibility to suit both a single tenant throughout or several different tenants.”


Inserting a new extension into an


existing building with unique conditions presented a number of challenges. In addition to maintaining the Victorian timber ceiling details, the team had to meet new fire regulations, as well as navigate single stair access across seven floors. The architects said the client “was also keen to experiment with the interplay between rich contemporary additions to the warehouse aesthetics”. Anodised metalwork and heritage style


openable windows “offset the weight of the brick host building”. At ground floor, the existing brick bays have been opened up to “create an active street presence, a new entrance and draw natural light into the impressive duplex ground and lower ground space”. New timber sash windows, replacement loading bay doors and repointed brickwork complete the exterior. “Internally, the interplay between the


original character of the building and contemporary features continues,” said ThirdWay Architecture. The original


Victorian timber ceiling details have been retained throughout and highlighted with simple lighting and servicing details. The new floors mirror this approach in engineered timber and “pared back column details” to “make the most of the expansive glazing to the upper levels”. Rough sawn timber flooring and a mix of exposed and painted brickwork complete the aesthetic of the floorplates. The concrete and brick staircase has


been accented with warm timber details and contemporary lighting. A new metal staircase connects the added upper floors.


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ADF OCTOBER 2019


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